affliction

’Tis joy to me to dwell in Thee,
At thought of Thee all grief retreats,
Thy mercies call for thanks, but all
I have to pay are tongue’s conceits.

Not heaven’s height can bound Thy might,
How then shall thought due praise assign?
Teach me, and bless with righteousness,
And let my will but further Thine.

The praise I bring as offering
Accept in lieu of sacrifice,
My service call memorial,
Pleased with Thy worshipper’s device.

Let Thy clear eye, O Lord, descry
How wretched are my fears and hopes,
And send Thy light to chase the night
In which my blinded spirit gropes.

In kindness great, compassionate,
O guard for me Thy tenderness,
Within its wideness let me hide
The vastness of my trespasses.

And as Thy name to me became
A treasure in my heart to stand,
So let to Thee my spirit be
A treasure held within Thy hand.

May it please Thee, O Lord my God,
To return to me in mercy,
And to bring me back to Thee in perfect repentance.
O dispose my heart and turn Thine ear to supplication,
And open my heart to Thy law,
And plant in my thoughts the fear of Thee,
And decree for me good decrees,
And annul the evil decrees against me,
And lead me not into the power of temptation,
Nor into the power of contempt,
And from all evil chances deliver me,
And hide me in Thy shadow until the havoc pass by,
And be with my mouth in my meditation,
And keep my ways from sin through my tongue,
And remember me when Thou rememberest and favourest Thy people,
And when Thou rebuildest Thy Temple,
That I may behold the bliss of Thy chosen ones,
And purify me to seek diligently Thy Sanctuary devastated and ruined,
And to cherish its stones and its dust,
And the clods of its desolation,
And rebuild Thou its wastes!

Wherever there are three persons, even though they are laymen, there is the church. Every man lives by his own faith, and God does not distinguish between classes. Since, in cases of necessity, you have the right to act as a priest, then you must also accept priestly discipline. It is God's will that all of us should be in the right spiritual state, at any time or place, to administer His sacraments.

If the soul is hardly conscious of this contemplation, such a person is only able to say that he is satisfied, tranquil and contented and that he is conscious of the presence of God… Pure contemplation is indescribable and therefore secret. This mystical knowledge has the property of hiding the soul within itself.

This dark, loving knowledge, which is faith, serves as a means for the divine union in this life as does the light of glory for the clear vision of God in the next. A person should not store up as treasures these visions, nor have the desire to cling to them. Our journey toward God must proceed through the negation of all. One should remain in emptiness and darkness regarding all creatures. He should base his love and joy on what he neither sees nor feels – that is, upon God who is incomprehensible and transcendent.

He who is able to suffer wrong with joy, though having means at hand to rebuff it, has consciously received from God the consolation of his faith.

You know, Monsieur, that, although the contemplative life is more perfect than the active life, it is not, however, more so than one which embraces at the same time contemplation and action, as does yours, by God's grace.

In this country my Lords... the individual subject... 'has nothing to do with the laws but to obey them'

The embodied soul, by means of good and evil deeds committed by itself, assumes many forms, coarse and fine. By virtue of its actions and also of such characteristics of the mind as knowledge and desire, it assumes another body for the enjoyment of suitable objects.

Petroleum is a more likely cause of international conflict than wheat.

How oft upon yon eminence our pace has slackened to a pause, and we have borne the ruffling wind, scarce conscious that it blew, while admiration, feeding at the eye, and still unsated, dwelt upon the scene.

How does man become mind? Clear intelligence and clear intelligence alone. We know, then, in all that fills heaven and earth there is but this clear intelligence. It is only because of their physical forms and bodies that men are separated. My clear intelligence is the master of heaven and earth and spiritual beings. If heaven is deprived of my clear intelligence, who is going to look into its height? If earth is deprived of my clear intelligence, who is going to look into its height? If earth is deprived of my clear intelligence, who is going to look into its depth? If spiritual beings are deprived of my clear intelligence, who is going to distinguish their good and evil fortune or the calamities and blessings that they will bring? Separated from my clear intelligence, there will be no heaven, earth, spiritual beings, or myriad things, and separated from these, there will not be my clear intelligence. Thus they are all permeated with one material force. How can they be separated?

The taste of the English in the cultivation of land, and in what is called landscape gardening, is unrivalled. They have studied nature intently, and discover an exquisite sense of her beautiful forms and harmonious combinations. Those charms which in other countries she lavishes in wild solitudes are here assembled round the haunts of domestic life. They seem to have caught her coy and furtive graces, and spread them, like witchery, about their rural abodes.

Just as a piece of shell can take all the fun out of an egg salad sandwich, just as the advent of an Ice Age can poop a million garden parties, just as a disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business, so can a fit of asthma rather spoil the first date between a young woman and an Indian.

Best men oft are moulded out of faults. Measure for Measure, Act I, Scene 2

But like of each thing that in season grows. Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act i, Scene 1

CAMILLO: You pay a great deal too dear for what's given freely. ARCHIDAMUS: Believe me, I speak as my understanding instructs me, and as mine honesty puts it to utterance. Winter’s Tale, Act i, Scene 1

Of the wealth of the world each has as much as they take.

Of two cowards, the one who finds the other out first has the advantage.