Skip navigation.

Appetite

Good is the cause of love, as being its object. But good is not the object of the appetite, except as apprehended. And therefore love demands some apprehension of the good that is loved... Accordingly knowledge is the cause of love for the same reason as good is, which can be loved only if known. -
It is impossible for any created good to constitute man’s happiness. For happiness is the perfect good, which quiets the appetite altogether since it would not be the last end if something yet remained to be desired. Now the object of the will, that is, of man’s appetite, is the universal good, just as the object of the intellect is the universal true. Hence it is evident that nothing can quiet man’s will except the universal good. This is to be found not in any creature, but in God alone, because every creature has goodness by participation. Therefore God alone can satisfy the will of man. -
The first impulse of conscience is apt to be right; the first impulse of appetite or passion is generally wrong. We should be faithful to the former, but suspicious of the latter. - Tyron Edwards
Envy, appetite and ambition lead to ruin. - Eleazar ha-Kappar, alternate spelling Eliezer ha-Kappar
Appetite is never satisfied, but remains in want and athirst. - Philo, aka Philo of Alexandria, Philo Judaeus, Philo Judaeus of Alexandria, Yedidia, "Philon", and Philo the Jew
Temperance and labor are the two best physicians; the one sharpens the appetite - the other prevents indulgence to excess. - Jean-Jacques Rousseau
A well governed appetite is a great part of liberty. -
Ambition is like hunger; it obeys no law but its appetite. -
It is certainly a very important lesson, to learn how to enjoy ordinary things, and to be able to relish your being, without the transport of some passion, or the gratification of some appetite. - Richard Steele, fully Sir Richard Steele
You are to come to your study as to the table, with a sharp appetite, whereby that which you read may the better digest. He that has no stomach to his book will very hardly thrive upon it. - William Russell, 1st Duke of Bedford
Syndicate content