A.C. Benson, fully Arthur Christopher “A.C.” Benson

A.C.
Benson, fully Arthur Christopher “A.C.” Benson
1862
1925

English Essayist, Poet, Author and 28th Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge

Author Quotes

I am sure it is one's duty as a teacher to try to show boys that no opinions, no tastes, no emotions are worth much unless they are one's own. I suffered acutely as a boy from the lack of being shown this.

The friend is the person whom one is in need of and by whom one is needed.

I believe in instinct, not reason. When reason is right, nine times out of ten it is impotent, and when it prevails, nine times out of ten it is wrong.

The moment that any life, however good, stifles you, you may be sure it isn't your real life.

I don't like authority, at least I don't like other people's authority.

The test of a good letter is a very simple one. If one seems to hear the other person talking as one reads, it is a good letter.

I expect that all of us get pretty much what we deserve of appreciation.

There remain times when one can only endure. One lives on, one doesn't die, and the only thing that one can do, is to fill one's mind and time as far as possible with the concerns of other people. It doesn't bring immediate peace, but it brings the dawn nearer.

It is often wonderful how putting down on paper a clear statement of a case helps one to see, not perhaps the way out, but the way in.

Religious worship is only as it were a postern by the side of the great portals of beauty and nobility and truth. One whose heart is filled with a yearning mystery at the sight of the starry heavens, who can adore the splendor of noble actions, courageous deeds, patient affections, who can see and love the beauty so abundantly shed abroad in the world… he can at all these moments draw near to God, and open his soul to the influx of the Divine Spirit.

The essence of religious liberty is that men should feel that there is nothing whatever that stands between themselves and God.

The joy of all mysteries is the certainty which comes from their contemplation, that there are many doors yet for the soul to open on her upward and inward way.

What we have to do is to see as deep as we can into the truth of things, not to invent paradises of thought, sheltered gardens, from which grief and suffering shall tear us, naked and protesting; but to gaze into the heart of God, and then to follow as faithfully as we can the imperative voice that speaks within the soul.

It is astonishing how the act of placing our own will as far as possible in unison with the Will of God restores our tranquility.

The worst sorrows in life are not in its losses and misfortune, but its fears.

Interests are anchors, and I believe they will bring peace and even happiness in the end.

It seems to me that the one privilege of friendship is "to quench the fiery darts of the wicked," to make the best of friends, to encourage and believe in them, to hand on the pleasant things.

Influence comes mostly to people who do not pursue it, and that the best kind of influence belongs to those who do not even know that they possess it.

Author Picture
First Name
A.C.
Last Name
Benson, fully Arthur Christopher “A.C.” Benson
Birth Date
1862
Death Date
1925
Bio

English Essayist, Poet, Author and 28th Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge