Ambrose Gwinett Bierce

Ambrose Gwinett
Bierce
1842
1914

American Editorialist, Journalist, Short Story Writer, Fabulist and Satirist

Author Quotes

The fact that boys are allowed to exist at all is evidence of remarkable Christian forbearance among men ? were it not for a mawkish humanitarianism, coupled with imperfect digestive powers, we should devour our young, as Nature intended.

The poor man's price of admittance to the favor of the rich is his self-respect.

They say that hens do cackle loudest when there is nothing vital in the eggs they have laid.

True, more than a half of the green graves in the Grafton cemetery are marked "Unknown," and sometimes it occurs that one thinks of the contradiction involved in "honoring the memory" of him of whom no memory remains to honor; but the attempt seems to do no great harm to the living, even to the logical.

Weather, n. The climate of an hour. A permanent topic of conversation among persons whom it does not interest, but who have inherited the tendency to chatter about it from naked arboreal ancestors whom it keenly concerned. The setting up of official weather bureaus and their maintenance in mendacity prove that even governments are accessible to suasion by the rude forefathers of the jungle.

While your friend holds you affectionately by both your hands, you are safe, for you can watch both his.

Youth, n. The Period of Possibility, when Archimedes finds a fulcrum, Cassandra has a following and seven cities compete for the honor of endowing a living Homer.

The gambling known as business looks with austere disfavor upon the business known as gambling.

The Senate is a body of old men charged with high duties and misdemeanors.

They were men. They crept upon their hands and knees. They used their hands only, dragging their legs. They used their knees only, their arms hanging idle at their sides. They strove to rise to their feet, but fell prone in the attempt. They did nothing naturally, and nothing alike, save only to advance foot by foot in the same direction. Singly, in pairs and in little groups, they came on through the gloom, some halting now and again while others crept slowly past them, then resuming their movement. They came by dozens and by hundreds; as far on either hand as one could see in the deepening gloom they extended and the black wood behind them appeared to be inexhaustible. The very ground seemed in motion toward the creek. Occasionally one who had paused did not again go on, but lay motionless. He was dead. Some, pausing, made strange gestures with their hands, erected their arms and lowered them again, clasped their heads; spread their palms upward, as men are sometimes seen to do in public prayer.

Truth is more deceptive than falsehood, for it is more frequently presented by those from whom we do not expect it, and so has against it a numerical presumption.

Wedding: A ceremony at which two persons undertake to become one, one undertakes to become nothing, and nothing undertakes to become supportable.

White, adj. and n. Black.

Zeal, n. A certain nervous disorder afflicting the young and inexperienced. A passion that goeth before a sprawl.

The game of discontent has its rules, and he who disregards them cheats. It is not permitted to you to wish to add another's advantages or possessions to your own; you are permitted only to wish to be another.

The slightest acquaintance with history shows that powerful republics are the most warlike and unscrupulous of nations.

They were obviously headstones of graves, though the graves themselves no longer existed as either mounds or depressions; the years had leveled all. Scattered here and there, more massive blocks showed where some pompous or ambitious monument had once flung its feeble defiance at oblivion.

Truth is so good a thing that falsehood can not afford to be without it.

What a woman most admires in a man is distinction among men. What a man most admires in a woman is devotion to himself.

Wisdom is known only by contrasting it with folly; by shadow only we perceive that all visible objects are not flat. Yet Philanthropos would abolish evil!

Zeus, n. The chief of Grecian gods, adored by the Romans as Jupiter and by the modern Americans as God, Gold, Mob and Dog. Some explorers who have touched upon the shores of America, and one who professes to have penetrated a considerable distance to the interior, have thought that these four names stand for as many distinct deities, but in his monumental work on Surviving Faiths, Frumpp insists that the natives are monotheists, each having no other god than himself, whom he worships under many sacred names.

Strive not for singularity in dress; Fools have the more and men of sense the less. To look original is not worthwhile, But be in mind a little out of style.

The hardest tumble a man can make is to fall over his own bluff.

The tendency to lie is one thing; lying is another.

This is a simple story of a battle; such a tale as may be told by a soldier who is no writer to a reader who is no soldier.

Author Picture
First Name
Ambrose Gwinett
Last Name
Bierce
Birth Date
1842
Death Date
1914
Bio

American Editorialist, Journalist, Short Story Writer, Fabulist and Satirist