Aristotle

Aristotle
384 B.C.
322 B.C.

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology

Author Quotes

You will never do anything in this world without courage. It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.

Without friends, no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.

Aristotle - Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow-ripening fruit.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.

To leave the number of births unrestricted, as is done in most states, inevitably causes poverty among the citizens, and poverty produces faction and crime.

The ultimate value of life depends on awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival.

The roots of education are bitter, but the fruits are sweet.

The least initial deviation from the truth is multiplied later a thousand fold.

Teachers, who educate children, deserve more honor than parents, who merely gave them birth; for the latter provided mere life, while the former ensure a good life.

The high-minded man must care more for the truth than for what people think.

Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime.

Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit. We become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts.

Not pleasure, but freedom from pain, is what the wise man will aim at.

Men’s ambition and their desire to make money are among the most frequent causes of deliberate acts of injustice.

It is easy to perform a good action, but not easy to acquire a settled habit of performing such actions.

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

In the arena of human life, the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.

I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self.

Happiness does not consist in pastimes and amusements, but in virtuous activities.

I count him braver who overcomes his desires than he who overcomes his enemies; for the hardest victory is the victory over self.

Happiness depends upon ourselves.

Happiness belongs to the self-sufficient.

Happiness [is] prosperity combined with virtue.

Dignity does not consist of possessing honors, but in deserving them.

From good parents comes a good son.

Author Picture
First Name
Aristotle
Birth Date
384 B.C.
Death Date
322 B.C.
Bio

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology