Aristotle

Aristotle
384 B.C.
322 B.C.

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology

Author Quotes

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.

The brave man is the man who faces or fears the right thing for the right purpose in the right manner at the right moment.

Anonymous: How should we behave to friends? Aristotle: As we should wish them to behave to us.

Wonder implies the desire to learn.

Wherever I go, there I am.

What we learn to do, we learn by doing.

Where we are free to act, we are also free to refrain from acting, and where we are able to say No, we are also able to say Yes.

We become what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not a single act but a habit!”

Wealth obviously is not the good we seek, for the sole purpose it serves is to provide the means for getting something else, pleasure, virtue and honor would have better title to be considered the good for they are to be desired for their account.

Virtue, like art, constantly deals with what is hard to do, and the harder the task the better success.

Those who educate children well are more to be honored than parents, for these only gave life, those the art of living well.

True happiness flows from the possession of wisdom and virtue and not from the possession of external goods.

The soul must necessarily be a real substance, as the form which determines a natural body, possessed potentially of life.

There is no more important element in the formation of a virtuous character than a rightly directed sense of pleasure and dislike; for pleasure and pain are coextensive with life, and they exercise a powerful influence in promoting virtue and happiness in life.

The soul is present with us as much while we are asleep as while we are awake; and, while waking resembles active observation, sleep resembles the implicit though not exercised possession of knowledge.

The life of the intellect is the best and pleasantest for man, because the intellect more than anything else is the man. Thus it will be the happiest life as well.

The poet’s function is to describe, not the thing that has happened, but a kind of thing that might happen… Poetry is something more philosophic and of graver import than history, since its statements are of the nature rather of universals, whereas those of history are singulars.

The greatest virtues are those which are most useful to other persons.

The greatest crimes are caused by excess and not by necessity.

Soul is actuality in the sense in which knowledge is so, for the presence of the soul is compatible both with sleep and with waking, and waking is analogous to the exercise of knowledge… the soul is the first actualization of a natural body potentially having life.

Nature… makes nothing in vain.

No government can stand which is not founded upon justice.

Nature does nothing without purpose or uselessly.

Man is by nature a political animal.

Mind seems to be an independent substance implanted within the soul and to be incapable of being destroyed.

Author Picture
First Name
Aristotle
Birth Date
384 B.C.
Death Date
322 B.C.
Bio

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology