Aristotle

Aristotle
384 B.C.
322 B.C.

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology

Author Quotes

What a man does should not worry his neighbor.

We should behave to our friends as we would wish our friends to behave to us.

We become just by performing just actions, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave actions.

We can not learn without pain....The intention makes the crime...I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is the victory over self.

War must be for the sake of peace, business for the sake of leisure, and all things necessary and useful for the sake of things noble.

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an art, but a habit.

Time is a measure of motion and of being moved.

To learn is a natural pleasure, not confined to philosophers, but common to all men.

Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well.

Thief knows thief, and wolf wolf.

Those who desire honor from good men, and men who know, are aiming at confirming their own opinion of themselves; they delight in honor, therefore, because they believe in their own goodness on the strength of the judgment of those who speak about them.

There was never a genius without a tincture of insanity.

There is a foolish corner even in the brain of the sage.

The wise man does not expose himself needlessly to danger, since there are few things for which he cares sufficiently; but he is willing, in great crises, to give even his life - knowing that under certain conditions it is not worth-while to live.

The states of virtue by which the soul possesses truth by way of affirmation or denial are five in number, i.e., art, scientific knowledge, practical wisdom, philosophical wisdom, intuitive wisdom: we do not included judgment and opinion because in these we may be mistaken.

The test of any government is the extent to which it increases the good in the people.

The search for truth is one way hard, and in another way easy. For it is evident that no one can master it fully, nor yet miss it wholly. But each adds a little to our knowledge of nature, and from all the facts assembled, there arises a certain grandeur.

The quality of life is determined by its activities.

The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.

The one exclusive sign of a thorough knowledge is the power of teaching.

The physician heals, Nature makes well.

The man with a host of friends who slaps on the back everybody he meets is regarded as the friend of nobody.

The middle course of life is the best.

The life of animals, then, may be divided into two acts - procreation and feeding; for on these two acts all their interests and life concentrate... And whatsoever is in conformity with nature is pleasant, and all animals pursue pleasure in keeping with their nature.

The life of children, as much as that of intemperate men, is wholly governed by their desires.

Author Picture
First Name
Aristotle
Birth Date
384 B.C.
Death Date
322 B.C.
Bio

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology