Aristotle

Aristotle
384 B.C.
322 B.C.

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology

Author Quotes

The end of labor is to gain leisure.

The activity of philosophic wisdom is admittedly the pleasantest of virtuous activities; at all events the pursuit of it is thought to offer pleasures marvelous for their purity and their enduringness, and it is to be expected that those who know ill pass their time more pleasantly than those who inquire. And the self-sufficiency that is spoken of must belong most to the contemplative activity.

The end of democracy is freedom; of oligarchy, wealth; of aristocracy, the maintenance of education and national institutions; of tyranny, the protection of the tyrant.

The activity of God, which surpasses all others in blessedness, must be contemplative; and of human activities, therefore, that which is most akin to this must be most of the nature of happiness.

Suffering becomes beautiful when anybody bears great calamities with cheerfulness, not through insensibility but through greatness of mind.

Teachers, who educate children, deserve more honor than parents who merely give them birth; for the latter provided mere life, while the former ensure a good life.

Some men are just as sure of the truth as are others of what they know.

States require property, but property, even though living beings are included in it, is no part of a state; for a state is not a community of living beings only, but a community of equals, aiming at the best life possible. Now, whereas happiness is the highest good, being a realization and perfect practice of virtue, which some can attain, while others have little or none of it, the various qualities of men are clearly the reason why there are various kinds of states and many; forms of government; for different men seek after happiness in different ways and by different means, and so make for themselves different modes of life and forms of government.

Since there must always be motion without intermission, there must necessarily be something, one thing or it may be a plurality, that first imparts motion, and this first movement must be unmoved.

Shame is an ornament to the young, a disgrace to the old, since an old man ought not to do anything of which he need be ashamed.

Property should be private, but the use of it common; and the special business of the legislator is to create in men this benevolent disposition.

Revolutions are not about trifles, but spring from trifles.

Praise invariably implies a reference to a higher standard.

Philosophy is the science which considers truth.

Poetry is something more philosophic and of graver import than history, since its statements are of nature of universals, whereas those of history are of singulars.

No one would choose a friendless existence on condition of having all the other things in the world.

No one will dare maintain that it is better to do injustice that to bear it.

No one will dare maintain that it is better to do injustice than to bear it.

Nature flies from the infinite, for the infinite is unending or imperfect, and Nature ever seeks an end.

No one loves the man he fears.

Nature does nothing without purpose.

Most people would rather get than give affection.

Nature creates nothing without a purpose, but always the best possible in each kind of living creature by reference to its essential constitution. Accordingly if one way is better than another that is the way of Nature.

Men regard it as their right to return evil for evil - and, if they cannot, feel they have lost their liberty.

Many a friendship is lost for lack of speaking.

Author Picture
First Name
Aristotle
Birth Date
384 B.C.
Death Date
322 B.C.
Bio

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology