Aristotle

Aristotle
384 B.C.
322 B.C.

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology

Author Quotes

Hope is a waking dream.

Honor others, for honor belongs to the one who bestows it and not to the one who receives it.

Health is better than strength and beauty.

He is by nature a slave who is capable of belonging to another.

He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.

Happiness seems to require a modicum of external prosperity.

Happiness is the true foundation of existence.

Good laws, if they are not obeyed, do not constitute good government.

Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence.

Friendship is communion.

Fear is pain arising from the anticipation of evil.

Every state is a community of some kind, and every community is established with a view to some good; for mankind always act in order to obtain that which they think good. But, if all communities aim at some good, the state or political community, which is the highest of all, and which embraces all the rest, aims at good in a greater degree than any other, and at the highest good.

Every rascal is not a thief, but every thief is a rascal.

Every result of chance is from what is spontaneous, but not everything that is from what is spontaneous is from chance.

Every action must be due to one or other of seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reasoning, anger or appetite.

Elderly Men... have lived many years; they have often been taken in, and often made mistakes; and life on the whole is a bad business. The result is that they are sure about nothing and under-do everything. They ‘think,’ but they never ‘know’; and because of their hesitation they always add a ‘possibly’ or a ‘perhaps’, putting everything this way and nothing positively. They are cynical; that is, they tend to put the worse construction on everything. Further, their experience makes them distrustful and therefor suspicious of evil. Consequently they neither love warmly nor hate bitterly, but... love as though they will some day hate and hate as though they will some day love. They are small-minded, because they have been humbled by life: their desires are set upon nothing more exalted or unusual than what will help them to keep alive... They live by memory rather than by hope; for what is left to them of life is but little as compared with the long past; and hope is of the future, memory of the past... Old men may feel pity, as well as young men, but not for the same reason. Young men feel it out of kindness; old men out of weakness, imagining that anything that befalls anyone else might easily happen to them.

Equality is friendship.

Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.

Education is the best provision for old age.

Doing well and happiness are the same thing.

Democracies are safer and more permanent than oligarchies, because they have a middle class which is more numerous and has a greater share in the government; for when there is no middle class, and the poor greatly exceed in number, troubles arise, and the state soon comes to an end.

Democracy arose from men's thinking that if they are equal in any respect, they are equal absolutely.

Comedy aims at representing men as worse, and tragedy as better than in real life.

Consider pleasures as they depart, not as they come.

Character is that which reveals moral purpose, exposing the class of things a man chooses or avoids

Author Picture
First Name
Aristotle
Birth Date
384 B.C.
Death Date
322 B.C.
Bio

Greek Philosopher, Student of Plato, Teacher of Alexander the Great, Scientist, Explored Physics, Metaphysics, Poetry, Theater, Music, Logic, Rhetoric, Linguistics, Politics, Government, Ethics, Biology and Zoology