Arnold Bennett, fully Enoch Thomas Arnold Bennett

Arnold
Bennett, fully Enoch Thomas Arnold Bennett
1867
1931

English Novelist, Playwright, Critic and Essayist

Author Quotes

It is within the experience of everyone that when pleasure and pain reach a certain intensity they are indistinguishable.

Nearly all bookish people are snobs, and especially the more enlightened among them. They are apt to assume that if a writer has immense circulation, if he is enjoyed by plain persons, and if he can fill several theatres at once, he cannont possibly be worth reading and merits only indifference and disdain.

Prepare to live by all means, but for Heaven's sake do not forget to live.

The man who is imbued with the idea of development, of continuous cause and effect, perceives in the sea an element which in the day-before-yesterday of geology was vapour, which yesterday was boiling, and which to-morrow will inevitably be ice.

The war years count double. Things and people not actively in use age twice as fast.

Which of us is not saying to himself which of us has not been saying to himself all his life: I shall alter that when I have a little more time? We never shall have any more time. We have, and we have always had, all the time there is.

Its language is a language which the soul alone understands, but which the soul can never translate.

Ninety percent of the friction of daily life is caused by tone of voice.

Procrastination is suicide on the installment plan.

The manner in which one single ray of light, one single precious hint, will clarify and energize the whole mental life of him who receives it, is among the most wonderful and heavenly of intellectual phenomena.

There can be no knowledge without emotion. We may be aware of a truth, yet until we have felt its force, it is not ours. To the cognition of the brain must be added the experience of the soul.

Without the power to concentrate that is to say, without the power to dictate to the brain its task and to ensure obedience true life is impossible. Mind control is the first element of a full existence.

Jane Austen? I feel that I am approaching dangerous ground. The reputation of Jane Austen is surrounded by cohorts of defenders who are ready to do murder for their sacred cause.

None of us has not been saying to himself all his life: I shall alter that when I have a little more time? We never shall have any more time. We have, and we have always had, all the time there is.

Readers of a certain class are apt to call good the plot of that story in which you can't tell what is going to happen next. But in some of the most tedious novels ever written you can't tell what is going to happen next--and you don't care a fig what is going to happen next.

The manner of his life was of no importance. What affected her was that he had once been young. That he had grown old, and was now dead. That was all. Youth and vigour had come to that. Youth and vigour always came to that. Everything came to that.

There grows in the North Country a certain kind of youth of whom it may be said that he is born to be a Londoner.

Worry is evidence of an ill-controlled brain; it is merely a stupid waste of time in unpleasantness. If men and women practiced mental calisthenics as they do physical calisthenics, they would purge their brains of this foolishness.

Journalists say a thing that they know isn't true, in the hope that if they keep on saying it long enough it will be true.

Not one of us has not been saying to himself all his life: I shall alter that when I have a little more time? We never shall have any more time. We have, and we have always had, all the time there is.

Some wonderful secret by which you may at any rate approach the ideal of a perfect arrangement of the

the mental faculties are capable of a continuous hard activity; they do not tire like an arm or a leg. All they want is change?not rest, except in sleep.

There is no magic method of beginning... Take hold of your nerves, and jump.

You are not in charge of the universe; you are in charge of yourself.

If egotism means a terrific interest in one's self, egotism is absolutely essential to efficient living.

Author Picture
First Name
Arnold
Last Name
Bennett, fully Enoch Thomas Arnold Bennett
Birth Date
1867
Death Date
1931
Bio

English Novelist, Playwright, Critic and Essayist