Arthur Aughey

Arthur
Aughey

Author, Senior lecturer in the School of Economics and Politics at the University of Ulster

Author Quotes

A cheerful spirit is one of the most valuable gifts ever bestowed upon humanity by a kind Creator. It is the sweetest and the most fragrant flower of the Spirit, that constantly sends out its beauty and fragrance, and blesses everything within its reach. It will sustain the soul in the darkest and most dreary places of this world. It will hold in check the demons of despair, and stifle the power of discouragement and hopelessness. It is the brightest star that ever cast its radiance over the darkened soul, and one that seldom sets in the gloom of morbid fancies and foreboding imaginations.

A firm faith is the best theology; a good life is the best philosophy, a clear conscience the best law; honesty the best policy, and temperance the best physic.

As a weak limb grows stronger by exercise, so will your faith be strengthened by the very efforts you make in stretching it out towards things unseen.

Cheerfulness is the friend and helper of all good graces, and the absence of it is certainly a vice.

Cheerfulness sharpens the edge and removes the rust from the mind. A joyous heart supplies oil to our inward machinery, and makes the whole of our powers work with ease and efficiency.

Faith without evidence is, properly, not faith, but prejudice or presumption; faith beyond evidence is superstition, and faith contrary to evidence is either insanity or willful perversity of mind.

Great things are not accomplished by idle dreams, but by years of patient study.

Happiness without peace is temporal; peace along with happiness is eternal.

It is one of the worst of errors to suppose that there is any other path of safety except that of duty.

Open your heart to sympathy, but close it against despondency. The flower which opens to receive the dew shuts against the rain

Sorrow comes soon enough without despondency. It does a man no good to carry around a lightning-rod to attract trouble.

The ability to find fault is believed, by some people, to be a sure sign of great wisdom, when, in most cases, it only indicates narrowness of mind and ill nature.

The chief secret of comfort lies in not suffering trifles to vex us, and in prudently cultivating an undergrowth of small pleasures, since very few great ones are let on long leases.

The most generous and merciful in judgment upon the faults of others, are always the most free from faults themselves.

There are many seasons in a man’s life - and the more exalted and responsible his position, the more frequently do these seasons recur - when the voice of duty and the dictates of feeling are opposed to each other; and it is only the weak and the wicked who yield that obedience to the selfish impulses of the heart which is due to reason and honor.

Author Picture
First Name
Arthur
Last Name
Aughey
Bio

Author, Senior lecturer in the School of Economics and Politics at the University of Ulster