William Wordsworth

William
Wordsworth
1770
1850

English Poet

Author Quotes

Come forth into the light of things, let nature be your teacher.

From the body of one guilty deed a thousand ghostly fears and haunting thoughts proceed.

God approves the depth, but not the tumult, of the soul.

Habit rules the unreflecting herd.

I have felt a presence that disturbs me with the joy of elevated thought; a sense sublime of something far more deeply interfused, whose dwelling is the light of setting suns, and the round ocean of the living air, and the blue sky, and in the mind of man - a motion and a spirit, that impels all thinking things, all objects of all thought, and rolls through all things.

Self-inspection - the best cure for self-esteem... By all means sometimes be alone; salute thyself; see what thy soul doth wear; dare to look in thy chest, and tumble up and down what thou findest there.

Strongest minds are often those of whom the noisy world hears last.

The best portion of a good man's life is his little, nameless, unremembered acts of kindness and love.

The eye - it cannot choose but see; we cannot bid the ear be still; our bodies feel, where ’er they be, against or with our will.

Thought and theory must precede all salutary action; yet action is nobler in itself that either thought or theory.

True dignity abides with him only, who, in the silent hour of inward thought, can still suspect, and still revere himself, in lowliness of heart.

We live by admiration, hope and love.

Wisdom is oft-times nearer when we stoop than when we soar.

Author Picture
First Name
William
Last Name
Wordsworth
Birth Date
1770
Death Date
1850
Bio

English Poet