Author 188114

William Ralph
Inge
1860
1954

English Prelate, Dean of Westminster, Writer

Author Quotes

Gambling is a disease of barbarians superficially civilized.

Let us remember, when we are inclined to be disheartened, that the private soldier is a poor judge of the fortunes of a great battle.

Philosophy means thinking things out for oneself. Ultimately, there can be only one true philosophy, since reason is one and we all live in the same world.

The modern world belongs to the half-educated, a rather difficult class, because they do not realize how little they know.

There is no law of progress. Our future is in our own hands, to make or to mar. It will be an uphill fight to the end, and would we have it otherwise? Let no one suppose that evolution will ever exempt us from struggles. 'You forget,' said the Devil, with a chuckle, 'that I have been evolving too.'

He who loves not his home and country which he has seen, how shall he love humanity in general which he has not seen?

Literature flourishes best when it is half a trade and half an art.

Prayer gives a man the opportunity of getting to know a gentleman he hardly ever meets. I do not mean his maker, but himself.

The phase of thought or feeling which we call Mysticism has its origin in that which is the raw material of all religion, and perhaps of all philosophy and art as well, namely, that dim consciousness of the beyond, which is part of our nature as human beings. Men have given different names to these "obstinate questionings of sense and outward things." We may call them, if we will, a sort of higher instinct, perhaps an anticipation of the evolutionary process; or an extension of the frontier of consciousness; or, in religious language, the voice of God speaking to us. Mysticism arises when we try to bring this higher consciousness into relation with the other contents of our minds.

They who will live for others shall have great troubles, but they shall seem to them small. Those who will live for themselves shall have small troubles, but they shall seem to them great.

How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive o all they do, and of all they are willing to endure.

Love remembered and consecrated by grief belongs, more clearly than the happy intercourse of friends, to the eternal world; it has proved itself stronger than death.

So the pendulum swings, now violently, now slowly; and every institution not only carries within it the seeds of its own dissolution, but prepares the way for its most hated rival.

The right use of leisure is no doubt a harder problem than the right use of our working hours. The soul is dyed the color of its leisure thoughts.

This is old, therefore it is good; the other says, this is new, therefore it is better.

I have no fear that the candle lighted in Palestine years ago will ever be put out.

Man as we know him is a poor creature; but he is half-way between an ape and a god, and he is travelling in the right direction.

Such as men themselves are, such will God appear to them to be; and such as God appears to them to be, such will they show themselves in their dealings with their fellow men.

The soul is dyed by the color of its leisure hours.

To marry is to get a binocular view of life.

I think middle-age is the best time, if we can escape the fatty degeneration of the conscience which often sets in at about fifty.

Many people believe that they are attracted by God, or by Nature, when they are only repelled by man.

Take away fear, and the battle of Freedom is half won.

The soul is dyed with the color of its leisure thoughts.

True contemplation considers Reality (or Being) in its manifestations as well as in its origin. If this is remembered, there need be no conflict between social morality and the inner life. Eckhart recognizes that it is a harder and a nobler task to preserve detachment in a crowd than in a cell; the little daily sacrifices of family life are often a greater trial than self-imposed mortifications. "We need not destroy any little good in ourselves for the sake of a better, but we should strive to grasp every truth in its highest meaning, for no one good contradicts another." "Love God, and do as you like, say the Free Spirits. Yes; but as long as you like anything contrary to God's will, you do not love Him."

Author Picture
First Name
William Ralph
Last Name
Inge
Birth Date
1860
Death Date
1954
Bio

English Prelate, Dean of Westminster, Writer