Wilma Mankiller, fully Wilma Pearl Mankiller

Wilma
Mankiller, fully Wilma Pearl Mankiller
1945
2010

First Female Chief of Cherokee Nation

Author Quotes

I want to be remembered as the person who helped us restore faith in ourselves.

The secret of our success is that we never, never give up.

A lot of young girls have looked to their career paths and have said they'd like to be chief. There's been a change in the limits people see.

If we're ever going to collectively begin to grapple with the problems that we have collectively, we're going to have to move back the veil and deal with each other on a more human level.

There are a whole lot of historical factors that have played a part in our being where we are today, and I think that to even to begin to understand our contemporary issues and contemporary problems, you have to understand a little bit about that history.

A significant number of people believe tribal people still live and dress as they did 300 years ago. During my tenure as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, national news agencies requesting interviews sometimes asked if they could film a tribal dance or if I would wear traditional tribal clothing for the interview. I doubt they asked the president of the United States to dress like a pilgrim for an interview.

If you argue with a fool, someone passing by will not be able to tell who is the fool and who is not.

There are the extremes on both sides. There are those who have turned their backs on being Cherokee. Then we have a few who refuse to speak much English and think children should only play stickball, not baseball or football. They are suspicious of the non-Indian world, thinking too much assimilation will cause one to stop thinking Cherokee.

America would be a better place if leaders would do more long-term thinking.

In Iroquois society, leaders are encouraged to remember seven generations in the past and consider seven generations in the future when making decisions that affect the people.

There were a significant number of people in this country that were still questioning whether Indians were human.

An Indian is an Indian regardless of the degree of Indian blood or which little government card they do or do not possess.

Individually and collectively, Cherokee people possess an extraordinary ability to face down adversity and continue moving forward.

Though many non-Native Americans have learned very little about us, over time we have had to learn everything about them. We watch their films, read their literature, worship in their churches, and attend their schools. Every third-grade student in the United States is presented with the concept of Europeans discovering America as a "New World" with fertile soil, abundant gifts of nature, and glorious mountains and rivers. Only the most enlightened teachers will explain that this world certainly wasn't new to the millions of indigenous people who already lived here when Columbus arrived.

But what I learned from my experience in living in a community of almost all African-American people, and what I learned from my experience in living in my own community in Oklahoma before the relocation is that poor people have a much, much greater capacity for solving their own problems than most people give them credit for.

It should be remembered that hundreds of people of African ancestry also walked the Trail of Tears with the Cherokee during the forced removal of 1838-1839. Although we know about the terrible human suffering of our native people and the members of other tribes during the removal, we rarely hear of those black people who also suffered.

We are a people with many, many social indicators of decline and an awful lot of problems, so in the fifties they decided to mainstream us, to try to take us away from the tribal land-base and the tribal culture, get us into the cities.

Cows run away from the storm while the buffalo charges toward it - and gets through it quicker. Whenever I?m confronted with a tough challenge, I do not prolong the torment, I become the buffalo.

It was on Alcatraz...where at long last some Native Americans, including me, truly began to regain our balance.

We celebrate Thanksgiving along with the rest of America, maybe in different ways and for different reasons. Despite everything that's happened to us since we fed the Pilgrims, we still have our language, our culture, our distinct social system. Even in a nuclear age, we still have a tribal people.

Every single person has leadership ability. Some step up and take them. Some don't. My answer was to step up and lead.

It was supposed to be a better life.

We must trust our own thinking. Trust where we're going. And get the job done.

Everybody is sitting around saying, 'Well, jeez, we need somebody to solve this problem of bias.' That somebody is us. We all have to try to figure out a better way to get along.

It's like everybody's sitting there and they have some kind of veil over their face, and they look at each other through this veil that makes them see each other through some stereotypical kind of viewpoint. If we're ever gonna collectively begin to grapple with the problems that we have collectively, we're gonna have to move back the veil and deal with each other on a more human level.

Author Picture
First Name
Wilma
Last Name
Mankiller, fully Wilma Pearl Mankiller
Birth Date
1945
Death Date
2010
Bio

First Female Chief of Cherokee Nation