Author

Jean-Jacques
Rousseau
1712
1778

Swiss-born French Philosopher, Novelist, Political Theorist

Author Quotes

Liberty is not to be found in any form of government, she is in the heart of the free man, he bears her with him everywhere.

To renounce liberty is to renounce being a man, to surrender the rights of humanity and even its duties. For him who renounces everything no indemnity is possible. Such a renunciation is incompatible with man’s nature; to remove all liberty from his will is to remove all morality from his acts.

Luxury, which cannot be prevented among men who are tenacious of their own convenience and of the respect paid them by others, soon completes the evil society had begun, and, under the pretense of giving bread to the poor, whom it should never have made such, impoverishes all the rest, and sooner or later depopulates the State.

To serve God is not to pass our lives on our knees in prayer; it is to discharge on earth those obligations which our duty requires.

Luxury is a remedy much worse than the disease it sets up to cure; or rather it is in itself the greatness of all evils; for every State, great or small: for, in order to maintain all the servants and vagabonds it creates, it brings oppression and ruin on the citizen and the laborer; it is like those scorching winds, which, covering the trees and plants with their devouring insects, deprive useful animals of their subsistence and spread famine and death wherever they blow.

When fate is adverse, a wise man can always strive for happiness and sail against the wind to attain it.

Never exceed your rights, and they will soon become unlimited.

Whoever blushes is already guilty; true innocence is ashamed of nothing.

A feeble body weakens the mind.

An honest man nearly always thinks justly.

First Name
Jean-Jacques
Last Name
Rousseau
Birth Date
1712
Death Date
1778
Bio

Swiss-born French Philosopher, Novelist, Political Theorist