Baron de Montesquieu, fully Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu

Baron de
Montesquieu, fully Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu
1689
1755

French Philosopher, Political Thinker and Social Commentator

Author Quotes

The freedom is the right to do what the law allows.

The more I started this book and his legacy, has been left to the winds a thousand times what you write papers, and you feel Bahbud hands parental every day, and I was walking behind my goal is the development of a project, and you do not know the rules nor homosexuals, and you do not find the truth, but to lose it, but I came to my principles when I discovered everything that you look for it, Vibsrt within twenty years of the start of my book and its growth and development and completeness.

The spirit of moderation should also be the spirit of the lawgiver.

There is something in animals beside the power of motion. They are not machines; they feel.

Vanity is as advantageous to a government, as pride is dangerous.

When we seek after wit, we discover only foolishness.

The general rule always holds good. In constitutional states liberty is a compensation of the heaviness of taxation. In despotic states the equivalent for liberty is the lightness of taxation.

The natural place of virtue is near to liberty; but it is not nearer to excessive liberty than to servitude.

The state is the association of men, and not men themselves; the citizen may perish, and the man remain.

There is still another inconveniency in conquests made by democracies; their government is ever odious to the conquered states. It is apparently monarchical, but in reality it is more oppressive than monarchy, as the experience of all ages and countries evinces.

Very good laws may be ill timed.

With truths of a certain kind, it is not enough to make them appear convincing: one must also make them felt. Of such kind are moral truths.

The government is like all things in the world to preserve it must be love.

The negroes prefer a glass necklace to that gold which polite nations so highly value. Can there be a greater proof of their wanting common sense?

The state of slavery is in its own nature bad.

There should be weeping at a man's birth, not at his death.

Virtue is necessary to a republic.

You have to study a great deal to know a little.

The history of commerce is that of the communication of the people.

The object of war is victory; that of victory is conquest; and that of conquest preservation.

The sublimity of administration consists in knowing the proper degree of power that should be exerted on different occasions.

These creatures are all over black, and with such a flat nose that they can scarcely be pitied.

We must have constantly present in our minds the difference between independence and liberty. Liberty is a right of doing whatever the laws permit, and if a citizen could do what they forbid he would no longer be possessed of liberty.

The alms given to a naked man in the street do not fulfil the obligations of the state, which owes to every citizen a certain subsistence, a proper nourishment, convenient clothing, and a kind of life not incompatible with health.

The honor of the conquest is rated by the difficulty.

Author Picture
First Name
Baron de
Last Name
Montesquieu, fully Charles-Louis de Secondat, Baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu
Birth Date
1689
Death Date
1755
Bio

French Philosopher, Political Thinker and Social Commentator