Charles Caleb Colton

Charles Caleb
Colton
1780
1832

English Writer, Clergyman and Collector

Author Quotes

Tyrants have not yet discovered any chains that can fetter the mind.

We owe almost all our knowledge not to those who have agreed, but to those who have differed.

We hate some people because we do not know them; and will not know them because we hate them.

True contentment depends not on what we have - a tub was large enough for Diogenes, but a world was too little for Alexander.

The mistakes of the fool are known to the world, but not to himself. The mistakes of the wise man are known to himself, but not to the world.

Works of true merit are seldom very popular in their own day; for knowledge is on the march and men of genius are the videttes that are far in advance of their comrades. They are not with them, but before them; not in the camp, but beyond it.

Great minds must be ready not only to take opportunities, but to make them.

Works of true merit are seldom very popular in their own day; for knowledge is on the march and men of genius are the videttes that are far in advance of their comrades. They are not with them, not in the camp, but beyond it.

Words indeed are but the sings and counters of knowledge, and their currency should be strictly regulated by the capital which they represent.

Where we cannot invent, we may at least improve; we may give somewhat of novelty to that which was old, condensation to that which was diffuse, perspicuity to that which was obscure, and currency to that which was recondite.

Who are they that would have all mankind look backward instead of forward, and regulate their conduct by things that have been done? Those who are most ignorant as to all things that are doing. Bacon said, time is the greatest of innovators; he might also have said the greatest of improvers.

Where true religion has prevented one crime, false religions have afforded a pretext for a thousand.

When young, we trust ourselves too much and we trust others too little when old. Rashness is the error of youth, timid caution of age. Manhood is the isthmus between the two extremes; the ripe and fertile season of action, when alone we can hope to find the head to contrive, united with the hand to execute.

When we feel a strong desire to thrust our advice upon others, it is usually because we suspect their weakness; but we ought rather to suspect our own.

When in the company of sensible men, we ought to be doubly cautious of talking too much, lest we lose two good things - their good opinion and our own improvement; for what we have to say we know, but what to say we know not.

When in reading we meet with any maxim that may be of use, we should take it for our own, and make an immediate application of it, as we would of the advice of a friend whom we have purposely consulted.

Wealth, after all, is a relative thing, since he that has little, and wants less, is richer than he that has much but wants more.

We strive as hard to hide our hearts from ourselves as from others, and always with more success; for in deciding upon our own case we are both judge, jury, and executioner, and where sophistry cannot overcome the first, or later the second, self-love is always ready to defeat the sentence by bribing the mind.

We should pray with as much earnestness as those who expect everything from God; we should act with as much energy as those who expect everything from themselves.

We should act with as much energy as those who expect everything from themselves; and we should pray with as much earnestness as those who expect everything from God.

We often pretend to fear what we really despise, and more often to despise what we really fear.

We may doubt the existence of matter, if we please, and like Berkeley deny it, without subjecting ourselves to the shame of a very conclusive confutation; but there is this remarkable difference between matter and mind, that he that doubts the existence of mind, by doubting proves it.

We ask advice, but we mean approbation.

We are ruined, not by what we really want, but by what we think we do; therefore, never go abroad in search of your wants: for if they be real wants they will come in search of you. He that buys what he does not want, will soon want what he cannot buy.

War kills men, and men deplore the loss; but war also crushes bad principles and tyrants, and so saves societies.

Author Picture
First Name
Charles Caleb
Last Name
Colton
Birth Date
1780
Death Date
1832
Bio

English Writer, Clergyman and Collector