Charles Caleb Colton

Charles Caleb
Colton
1780
1832

English Writer, Clergyman and Collector

Author Quotes

In religion as in politics it so happens that we have less charity for those who believe half our creed, than for those who deny the whole of it.

Injuries accompanied with insults are never forgiven; all men, on these occasions, are good haters and layout their revenge at compound interest.

It is a curious paradox that precisely in proportion to our own intellectual weakness will be our credulity, to those mysterious powers assumed by others.

It is more easy to forgive the weak who have injured us, than the powerful whom we have injured. The conduct will be continued by our fears which commenced in our resentment.

It is much easier to ruin a man of principle than a man of none, for he may be ruined through his scruples. Knavery is supple and can bend; but honesty is firm and upright, and yields not.

It is not so difficult a task to plant new truths as to root out old errors; for there is this paradox in men - they run after that which is new, but are prejudiced in favor of that which is old.

It is with diseases of the mind as with those of the body; we are half dead before we understand our disorders, and half cured when we do.

Author Picture
First Name
Charles Caleb
Last Name
Colton
Birth Date
1780
Death Date
1832
Bio

English Writer, Clergyman and Collector