Charles Caleb Colton

Charles Caleb
Colton
1780
1832

English Writer, Clergyman and Collector

Author Quotes

Physical courage which despises all danger, will make a man brave in one way; and moral courage, which despises all opinion, will make a man brave in another. The former would seem most necessary for the camp; the latter for the council; but to constitute a great man both are necessary.

Patience is the support of weakness; impatience is the ruin of strength.

Our wealth is often a snare to ourselves, and always a temptation to others.

Of all the passions, jealously is that which exacts the hardest service, and pays the bitterest wages. Its service is to watch the success of our enemy; its wages to be sure of it.

Our incomes are like our shoes; if too small, they gall and pinch us; but if too large, they cause us to stumble and trip.

Of all the faculties of the mind, memory is the first that flourishes and the first that dies.

Of all the faculties of the mind, memory is the first that flourishes, the first that dies.

Nothing more completely baffles one who is full of trick and duplicity, than straightforward and simple integrity.

None are so fond of secrets as those who do not mean to keep them. Such persons covet secrets as spendthrifts do money, for the purpose of circulation.

No man can purchase his virtue too dear, for it is the only thing whose value must ever increase with the price it has cost us. Our integrity is never worth so much as when we have parted with our all to keep it.

No company is preferable to bad, because we are more apt to catch the vices of others than their virtues, as disease is far more contagious than health.

No man can promise himself even fifty years of life, but any man may, if he please, live in the proportion of fifty years in forty - let him rise early, that he may have the day before him, and let him make the most of the day, by determining to expend it on two sorts of acquaintance only - those by whom something may be got, and those from whom something may be learnt.

Mystery is not profoundness.

Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time, which every day produces, and which most men throw away, but which nevertheless will make at the end of it no small deduction for the life of man.

Most of our misfortunes are more supportable than the comments of our friends upon them.

Moderation is the inseparable companion of wisdom, but with it genius has not even a nodding acquaintance.

Mental pleasures never cloy; unlike those of the body, they are increased by repetition, approved of by reflection, and strengthened by enjoyment.

Men's arguments often prove nothing but their wishes.

Mental pleasures never clog; unlike those of the body, they are increased by repetition, approved of by reflection, and strengthened by enjoyment.

Men will wrangle for religion, write for it, fight for it, die for it; anything but live for it.

Men spend their lives in anticipations, in determining to be vastly happy at some period when they have time. But the present time has one advantage over every other - it is our own. Past opportunities are gone, future are not come. We may lay in a stock of pleasures, as we would lay in a stock of wine; but if we defer the tasting of them too long, we shall find that both are soured by age.

Men pursue riches under the idea that their possession will set them at ease and above the world. But the law of association often makes those who begin by loving gold as a servant, finish by becoming its slave; and independence without wealth is at least as common as wealth without independence.

Men pursue riches under the idea that their possession will set them at ease and above the world. But the law of association often makes those who begin by loving gold as a servant, finish by becoming its slaves; and independence without wealth is at least as common as wealth without independence.

Men are born with two eyes, but only one tongue, in order that they should see twice as much as they say.

Memory is the friend of wit, but the treacherous ally of invention; there are many books that owe their success to two things; good memory of those who write them, and the bad memory of those who read them.

Author Picture
First Name
Charles Caleb
Last Name
Colton
Birth Date
1780
Death Date
1832
Bio

English Writer, Clergyman and Collector