Charles Kingsley

Charles
Kingsley
1819
1875

English Clergyman, Novelist, Poet, Priest of the Church of England, University Professor and Historian

Author Quotes

Still the race of hero spirits pass the lamp from hand to hand.

Purge me therefore, O Lord, though it be with fire. Burn up the chaff of vanity and self-indulgence, of hasty prejudices, second-hand dogmas,--husks which do not feed my soul, with which I cannot be content, of which I feel ashamed daily--and if there be any grains of wheat in me, any word or thought or power of action which may be of use as seed for my nation after me, gather it, O Lord, into Thy garner.

So fleet the works of men, back to their earth again; Ancient and holy things fade like a dream.

Possession means to sit astride the world Instead of having it astride of you.

Pray over every truth; for though the renewed heart is not "desperately wicked," it is quite deceitful enough to become so, if God be forgotten a moment.

Our wanton accidents take root, and grow to vaunt themselves God's laws. Possession means to sit astride the world instead of having it astride of you.

Pain is no evil, unless it conquers us.

One good man, one man who does not put on his religion once a week with his Sunday coat, but wears it for his working dress, and lets the thought of God grow into him, and through and through him, till everything he says and does becomes religious, that man is worth a thousand sermons -- he is a living Gospel -- he comes in the spirit and power of Elias -- he is the image of God. And men see his good works, and admire them in spite of themselves, and see that they are God-like, and that God's grace is no dream, but that the Holy Spirit is still among men, and that all nobleness and manliness is His gift, His stamp, His picture: and so they get a glimpse of God again in His saints and heroes, and glorify their Father who is in heaven.

No earnest thinker is a plagiarist pure and simple. He will never borrow from others that which he has not already, more or less, thought out for himself.

Nothing that man ever invents will absolve him from the universal necessity of being good as God is good, righteous as God is righteous, and holy as God is holy.

Music is a sacred, a divine, a God-like thing, and was given to man by Christ to lift our hearts up to God, and make us feel something of the glory and beauty of God, and of all which God has made.

It is only the great hearted who can be true friends. The mean and cowardly, Can never know what true friendship means.

Love can make us fiends as well as angels.

If you wish to be like a little child, study what a little child could understand,--Nature; and do what a little child could do,--love.

It has been said that true religion will make a man a more thorough gentleman than all the courts in Europe. And it is true; you may see simple laboring men as thorough gentlemen as any duke, simply because they have learned to fear God; and, fearing Him, to restrain themselves, which is the very root and essence of all good-breeding.

It is a painful fact, but there is no denying it, the masts are the tools of circumstances; thistle-down on the breeze, straw on the river, their course is shaped for them by the currents and eddies of the stream of life; but only in proportion as they are things, not men and women. Man was meant to be not the slave, but the master, of circumstances, and in proportion as he recovers his humanity, in every sense of the great obsolete word,--in proportion as he gets back the spirit of manliness, which is self-sacrifice, affection, loyalty to an idea beyond himself, a God above himself, so far will he rise above circumstances, and wield them at his will.

I believe not only in "special providences," but in the whole universe as one infinite complexity of "special providences."

He was one of those men who possess almost every gift, except the gift of the power to use them.

I am not aware that payment, or even favors, however gracious, bind any man's soul and conscience in questions of highest morality and highest importance.

Grandeur... consists in form, and not in size: and to the eye of the philosopher, the curve drawn on a paper two inches long, is just as magnificent, just as symbolic of divine mysteries and melodies, as when embodied in the span of some cathedral roof.

Have charity; have patience; have mercy. Never bring a human being, however silly, ignorant, or weak--above all, any little child--to shame and confusion of face. Never by petulance, by suspicion, by ridicule, even by selfish and silly haste--never, above all, by indulging in the devilish pleasure of a sneer--crush what is finest and rouse up what is coarsest in the heart of any fellow-creature.

For science is . . . like virtue, its own exceeding great reward.

Friendship is like a glass ornament, once it is broken it can rarely be put back together exactly the same way.

Feelings are like chemicals--the more you analyze them the worse they smell. So it is best not to stir them up very much, only enough to convince one's self that they are offensively wrong, and then look away as far as possible, out of one's self, for a purifying power; and that we know can only come from Him who holds our hearts in His hands, and can turn us whither He will.

For men must work and women must weep, And the sooner it's over the sooner to sleep, And good-bye to the bar and its moaning.

Author Picture
First Name
Charles
Last Name
Kingsley
Birth Date
1819
Death Date
1875
Bio

English Clergyman, Novelist, Poet, Priest of the Church of England, University Professor and Historian