Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully

Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully
106
43 B.C.

Roman Philosopher, Statesman, Lawyer, Political Theorist, and Roman Constitutionalist, considered one of Rome's greatest Orators and Prose Stylists

Author Quotes

The wise man is always happy, and every good thing is full of joy.

The whole of virtue consists in its practice.

The wise are instructed by reason; ordinary minds, by experience; the stupid, by necessity; and brutes by instinct.

The thirst of desire is never filled, nor fully satisfied.

The true medicine of the mind is philosophy.

The search after truth is peculiar to man.

The shifts of fortune test the reliability of friends.

The philosopher’s whole life is a preparation for death.

The pursuit, even of the best things, ought to be calm and tranquil.

The noblest spirit is most strongly attracted by the love of glory.

The only excuse for war is that we may live unharmed in peace.

The life of the dead is placed in the memory of the living.

The more law the less justice.

The home is the empire! There is no peace more delightful than one's own fireplace.

The life given us by nature is short, but the memory of a well-spent life is eternal.

The good of the people is the chief law.

The first bond of society is marriage.

The great affairs of life are not performed by physical strength, or activity, or nimbleness of body, but by deliberation, character, expression of opinion. Of these old age is not only not deprived, but, as a rule, has them in a greater degree.

The diseases of the mind are more and more destructive than those of the body.

The fact is that old age is respectable just as long as it asserts itself, maintains its proper rights, and is not enslaved to any one. For as I admire a young man who has something of the old man in him, so do I an old one who has something of a young man. The man who aims at this may possibly become old in body - in mind he never will.

The best orator is the one who address instructs, delights, and moves the minds of the hearers. The orator is obliged to instruct, while pleasure is gratuity granted to the audience. But to stir the emotions is indispensable.

The cultivation of the mind is a kind of good supplied for the soul of man.

Superstition consists in a senseless fear of the gods, religion in the pious worship of them.

The beginnings of all things are small.

Scurrility has no object in view but incivility; if it is uttered from feelings of petulance, it is mere abuse; if it is spoken in a joking manner, it may be considered raillery.

Author Picture
First Name
Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully
Birth Date
106
Death Date
43 B.C.
Bio

Roman Philosopher, Statesman, Lawyer, Political Theorist, and Roman Constitutionalist, considered one of Rome's greatest Orators and Prose Stylists