Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully

Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully
106
43 B.C.

Roman Philosopher, Statesman, Lawyer, Political Theorist, and Roman Constitutionalist, considered one of Rome's greatest Orators and Prose Stylists

Author Quotes

Confidence is that feeling by which the mind embarks in great and honorable courses with a sure hope and trust in itself.

Brevity is the charm of eloquence.

Certain signs precede certain events.

Avarice in old age is foolish; for what can be more absurd than to increase our provisions for the road, the nearer we approach to our journey’s end?

Books are the food of youth, the delight of old age; the ornament of prosperity, the refuge and comfort of adversity; a delight at home, and no hindrance abroad; companions by night, in traveling, in the country.

As the grace of man is in the mind, so the beauty of the mind is eloquence.

As thou sowest, so shalt thou reap.

As a field, however fertile, cannot be fruitful without civilization, neither can a mind without learning.

As I approve of a youth that has something of the old man in him, so I am no less pleased with an old man that has something of the youth. He that follows this rule, may be old in body, but can never be so in mind.

An unjust peace is better than a just war.

Any man may commit a mistake, but none but a fool will continue in it.

A room without books is a body without a soul.

Although physicians frequently know their patients will die of a given disease, they never tell them so. To warn of an evil is justified only if, along with the warning, there is a way of escape.

A perverse temper, and a discontented, fretful disposition, wherever they prevail, render any state of life unhappy.

A man does not wonder what he sees frequently, even though he be ignorant of the reason.

A man would have no pleasures in discovering all the beauties of the universe, even in heaven itself, unless he had a partner to whom he might communicate his joys.

Without doubt, the highest privilege of wealth is the opportunity it affords for doing good, without giving up one’s fortune.

A happy life consists in tranquillity of mind.

Wickedness resides in the very hesitation about an act, even though it be not perpetrated.

Wisdom is the only thing which can relieve us from the sway of the passions and the fear of danger, and which can teach us to bear the injuries of fortune itself with moderation, and which shows us all the ways which lead to tranquillity.

What is dishonestly got vanishes in profligacy.

What is dignity without honesty?

We should be as careful of our words as of our actions, and as far from speaking ill as from doing ill.

We should not be so taken up in the search for truth, as to neglect the needful duties of active life; for it is only action that gives a true value and commendation to virtue.

We ought to regard amiability as the quality of woman, dignity that of man.

Author Picture
First Name
Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully
Birth Date
106
Death Date
43 B.C.
Bio

Roman Philosopher, Statesman, Lawyer, Political Theorist, and Roman Constitutionalist, considered one of Rome's greatest Orators and Prose Stylists