Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi

Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi
550 B.C.
478 B.C.

Chinese Moral Teacher, Philosopher, Thinker, Political Figure, Educator, and Founder of the Ru School of Chinese thought, his teachings preserved in the collection of aphorisms known as Lunyu or Analects

Author Quotes

The superior man is intelligently, not blindly, faithful.

The superior man is satisfied and composed; the man is always full of distress.

The superior man is slow in his words and earnest in his conduct.

The superior man makes the difficulty to be over come his first interest; success comes only later.

The superior man thinks of his character, the inferior of his position.

The superior man will watch over himself when he is alone. He examines his heart that there may be nothing wrong there, and that he may have not cause of dissatisfaction with himself.

The superior man... does not set his mind either for or against anything; he will pursue whatever is right.

The way of a superior man is threefold. Virtuous, he is free from anxieties; wise, he is free from perplexities; bold, he is free from fear.

There is no place in the highest heavens above nor in the deepest waters below where the moral law does not reign.

To acknowledge our faults when we are blamed, is modesty; to discover them to one's friends, in ingenuousness, is confidence; but to proclaim them to the world, if one does not take care, is pride.

To be able under all circumstances to practice five things constitutes perfect virtue; these five are gravity, generosity of soul, sincerity, earnestness, and kindness.

To have faults and not reform them - that may indeed be called having faults.

To rank the effort above the prize - is not this the way to exalt virtue?

To see and listen to the wicked is already the beginning of wickedness.

Virtue never dwells alone; it always has neighbors.

What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others.

When you have faults, do not fear to abandon them.

When you see a good man, think of emulating him; when you see a bad man, examine your own heart [innerself].

Wisdom, compassion and courage - these are three universally recognized moral qualities of man. It matters not in what way men come to the exercise of these moral qualities, the result is one and the same. When a man understands the nature and use of these three moral qualities, he will then understand how to put in order his personal conduct and character; he will understand how to govern men.

Author Picture
First Name
Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi
Birth Date
550 B.C.
Death Date
478 B.C.
Bio

Chinese Moral Teacher, Philosopher, Thinker, Political Figure, Educator, and Founder of the Ru School of Chinese thought, his teachings preserved in the collection of aphorisms known as Lunyu or Analects