Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi

Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi
550 B.C.
478 B.C.

Chinese Moral Teacher, Philosopher, Thinker, Political Figure, Educator, and Founder of the Ru School of Chinese thought, his teachings preserved in the collection of aphorisms known as Lunyu or Analects

Author Quotes

The gem cannot be polished without friction, nor man perfected without trial.

Tell me and I'll forget. Show me and I'll remember. Involve me and I'll understand.

Real knowledge is to know the extent of ones ignorance.

It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop.

Forget injuries, never forget kindnesses.

A disciple having asked for a definition of charity, the Master said, "Love one another."

Without knowing the force of words, it is impossible to know men.

Without feelings of respect, what is there to distinguish men from beasts?

While still unable to do your duty to the living, how can you do your duty to the dead?... Not yet understanding life, how can you understand death?

Wherever you go, go with all your heart.

When young, beware of fighting; when strong, beware of sex; and when old, beware of possession.

When a prince’s personal conduct is correct, his government is effective without the issuing of orders. If his personal conduct is not correct, he may issue orders, but they will not be followed.

What you do not want done to yourself do not do to others.

What is God-given is called nature; to follow nature is called Tao (the Way); to cultivate the way is called culture. Before joy, anger, sadness and happiness are expressed, they are called the inner self; when they are expressed to the proper degree, they are called harmony. The inner self is the correct foundation of the world, and the harmony is the illustrious Way. When a man has achieved the inner self and harmony, the heaven and earth are orderly and the myriad of things are nourished and grow thereby.

We should feel sorrow, but not sink under its oppression; the heart of a wise man should resemble a mirror, which reflects every object without being sullied by any.

Tzu-lu asked about government. The Master said, “Lead them; encourage them!” Tzu-lu asked for a further maxim. The Master said, “Untiringly.”

Tsze-kung asked, saying, “Is there one word which may serve as a rule of practice for all one’s life?” The Master said, “Is not Reciprocity such a word? What you do not want don’t to yourself, do not to others.”

Tzu-kung asked saying, `Is there any single saying that one can act upon all day and every day?’ The Master said, `Perhaps the saying about consideration: Never do unto others what you would not like them to do to you.’

To see what is right and not to do it is want of courage.

To know what is right and not to do it is the worst cowardice.

To find the central clue to our moral being which unites us to the universal order, that indeed is the highest human attainment.

To error and not reform, this may indeed be called error.

To be wronged is nothing unless you continue to remember it.

To be fond of learning is to draw close to wisdom. To practice with vigor is to draw close to benevolence. To know the seen of shame is to draw close to courage. He who knows these three things knows how to cultivate his own character. Knowing how to cultivate his own character, he knows how to govern other men. Knowing how to govern other men, he knows how to govern the world, it states, and its families.

Till you have learnt to serve people, how can you serve ghosts?... Till you know the living, how are you to know about the dead.

Author Picture
First Name
Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi
Birth Date
550 B.C.
Death Date
478 B.C.
Bio

Chinese Moral Teacher, Philosopher, Thinker, Political Figure, Educator, and Founder of the Ru School of Chinese thought, his teachings preserved in the collection of aphorisms known as Lunyu or Analects