Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi

Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi
550 B.C.
478 B.C.

Chinese Moral Teacher, Philosopher, Thinker, Political Figure, Educator, and Founder of the Ru School of Chinese thought, his teachings preserved in the collection of aphorisms known as Lunyu or Analects

Author Quotes

Artful speech and insinuating looks rarely accompany true virtue.

Always and in everything let there be reverence.

A youth is to be regarded with respect. How do you know that his future will not be equal to our present?

A year's opportunities depend on the spring, a days' on the dawn, a family's on harmony, a life's on industry.

A scholar who loves comfort is not fit to be called a scholar.

A good and virtuous wife is the most precious jewel of one's life.

A man who has committed a mistake and doesn't correct it is committing another mistake.

A man can enlarge his principles; his principles do not enlarge a man.

A superior man is ashamed if his words are better than his deeds.

A superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions.

A superior man is the one who is free from fear and anxieties.

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

Few are those who err on the side of self-restraint.

Cultivate unity. You do your hearing, not with your ears, but with your mind; not with your mind, but with your very soul. But let the hearing stop with the ears. Let the working of the mind stop with itself. Then the soul will be a negative existence, passively responsive to externals. In such a negative existence, only Tao can abide. And the negative state is the fasting of the heart.

Fine words and an insinuating appearance are seldom associated with true virtue.

He who merely knows right principles is not equal to him who loves them.

He who speaks without modesty will find it difficult to make his words good.

He who wishes to secure the good of others, has already secured his own.

He whose mind is really set on virtue will do no evil.

Humility is the foundation of all virtues.

If a man attack his own failings instead of those of others, will he not remedy his personal faults?

If a man put duty first and success after, will not that improve his character?

If I am virtuous and worthy, for whom should I not maintain a proper concern?

It is hard to find a man who has studied for three years without making some progress in virtue.

It is harder to be poor without murmuring, than to be rich without arrogance.

Author Picture
First Name
Confucius, aka Kong Qiu, Zhongni, K'ung Fu-tzu or Kong Fuzi
Birth Date
550 B.C.
Death Date
478 B.C.
Bio

Chinese Moral Teacher, Philosopher, Thinker, Political Figure, Educator, and Founder of the Ru School of Chinese thought, his teachings preserved in the collection of aphorisms known as Lunyu or Analects