Dōgen, aka Dōgen Kigen, Eihei Dōgen, titled as Dōgen Zenji

Dōgen, aka Dōgen Kigen, Eihei Dōgen, titled as Dōgen Zenji
1200
1253

Japanese Zen Monk, Zen Buddhist Teacher and Founder of the Soto School of Zen in Japan. "Zenji" is a title meaning zen master, and the name Dogen means roughly "Source of the Way"

Author Quotes

As I study both the exoteric and the esoteric schools of Buddhism, they maintain that human beings are endowed with Dharma-nature by birth. If this is the case, why did the Buddhas of all ages — undoubtedly in possession of enlightenment — find it necessary to seek enlightenment and engage in spiritual practice?

In a mind clear as still water,even the waves, breaking,are reflecting its light.

Students of the Way must not study Buddhism for the sake of themselves. They must study Buddhism only for the sake of Buddhism. The key to this is to renounce both body and mind without holding anything back and to offer them to the great sea of Buddhism.

To hear "Refrain from all evil whatever" is to hear what the genuine Dharma of Buddha is.

Because monks come from the midst of purity, they consider as good and pure what does not arouse desire among other people.

In Buddhism, we have always spoken not only of body and mind as being inseparable, but also of the nature of something and the form it takes as not being two different things.

Students, when you want to say something, think about it three times before you say it. Speak only if your words will benefit yourselves and others. Do not speak if it brings no benefit.

To start from the self and true to understand all things is delusion. To let the self be awakened by all things is enlightenment. To be enlightened about delusion is to be the Buddha. To be deluded in the midst of enlightenment is to be an ordinary person.

Buddhas and Ancestors continuously maintain ocean mudra samadhi. While swimming in this samadhi, they expound, realize, practice.

In preparing food never view it from the perspective of usual mind.

Studying Zen is zazen [Zen sitting]. For zazen, one should have a quiet place.

To study the Buddha way is to study the self. To study the self is to forget the self. To forget the self is to be enlightened by the ten thousand things.

Do not discriminate . . . whether the monks are senior or junior. . . . Although there are differences between seniors and juniors, all are equally members of the assembly.

In preparing food, it is essential to be sincere and to respect each ingredient irregardless of how coarse or fine it is . . . Even the grandest offering to the Buddha, if insincere, is worth less than the smallest sincere offering in bringing about a connection with awakening.

That place where 'sentient beings take their delight and play' has continually existed as the Buddha's Pure Land, which can never be destroyed. We must meticulously make this our fundamental practice.

Truth is perfect and complete in itself. It is not something newly discovered; it has always existed. Truth is not far away. It is nearer than near. There is no need to attain it, since not one of your steps leads away from it. Don't follow the advice of others; rather, learn to listen to the voice within yourself. Your body and mind will become one, and you will realize the unity of all things.

Do your training and practice, even though you may still be attached to discriminatory thinking, and do your training and practice, even if you have gone beyond discriminatory thinking, and even though you may be half-hearted in the attempt.

It is not bad and may be recommendable to do mindfulness training lying down, for example when weak and elderly.

The beasts and minions of Mara are many.

When one listens to what the worldly praise, one fails to get the truly wise. If one would get the truly wise, one should have the wisdom to illumine behind and see ahead.

Each and every extraordinary activity, is simply having rice.

Just study Buddhism. Don't follow the sentiments of the world.

The black dragon's jewel you have been searching for, is everywhere.

When other sects speak well of Zen, the first thing that they praise is its poverty.

Examine the rice and sand so that rice is not thrown out with sand.

Author Picture
First Name
Dōgen, aka Dōgen Kigen, Eihei Dōgen, titled as Dōgen Zenji
Birth Date
1200
Death Date
1253
Bio

Japanese Zen Monk, Zen Buddhist Teacher and Founder of the Soto School of Zen in Japan. "Zenji" is a title meaning zen master, and the name Dogen means roughly "Source of the Way"