Dōgen, aka Dōgen Kigen, Eihei Dōgen, titled as Dōgen Zenji

Dōgen, aka Dōgen Kigen, Eihei Dōgen, titled as Dōgen Zenji
1200
1253

Japanese Zen Monk, Zen Buddhist Teacher and Founder of the Soto School of Zen in Japan. "Zenji" is a title meaning zen master, and the name Dogen means roughly "Source of the Way"

Author Quotes

Having once realized the Place, you must not analyze It in order to understand It through discriminatory thought and, thereby, reduce It to fit your own opinions.

Never think that those who possess the five or six spiritual abilities . . . are in any way superior to an ordinary, everyday person.

The fifth patriarch of Zen was once a pine-planting wayfarer; Rinzai worked on planting cedars and pines on Mount Obaku. . . . Working with trees walls, if they practice sincerely they will attain enlightenment.

Wicked ministers seek court ranks with flattery. Thus, the disorder of the world increases and the country cannot avoid peril.

I come to realize that mind is no other than mountains and rivers and the great wide earth, the sun and the moon and stars.

Not to use the wise is a loss to the country; to use the unworthy is a regret for the country.

The holy ones do not stop at dhyana [meditation], and yet they do not oppose dhyana

Worldly duties do not, in and of themselves, impede the Buddha Dharma.

I decided to compile a record of the customs and standards that I experienced first-hand in the Zen monasteries of the great Kingdom of Sung, together with a record of profound instruction from a counselor which I have received and maintained. I will leave this record to people who learn in practice and are easy in the truth, so that they can know the right Dharma of the Buddha's lineage.

Our ancient forebear [Huihong] says here, "Dhyana is but one among various practices; how could it suffice to exhaust [the practice of] the holy ones?"

The primordial Buddhas are saying, "Not doing wrong action, sincerely doing every kind of good, naturally clarifies this mind. This is the Teaching of all the Buddhas." This is the universal precept of the Seven Buddhas, our Founding Ancestors, and is truly transmitted by earlier Buddhas to later Buddhas and is received by later Buddhas from earlier Buddhas. It is not only the Teaching of the Seven Buddhas but of all the Buddhas. This principle must be investigated and mastered through practice.

You should find a fit place to do a Zen sitting, and a suitable, comfortable sitting pose so as to have the very best results possible. And you are not do something that is all unnatural for you either. First, you may take a few deep breaths when you start to meditate (optional). You are asked to breathe in your own normal, natural rhythms. As soon as you get distracted, you at once just accept that it happened, and continue your mindfulness training. So do not worry about thoughts coming and going, and keep going. You are called to make sure that you are comfortable, that is, adequately fed, clothed, and rested, to be better able to harmonise body and mind.

If learners practice sincerely they attain enlightenment. Working with trees and walls, if they practice sincerely they will attain enlightenment. This is because trees and walls are fellow students; they are of the same essence.

People who truly follow the Way would do well to conceal the fact that they are Buddhists.

The recognition of the coming and going of things is a first step in training and practice.

You should regret that time, in unseen ways, is depriving you of your life of training in the Way.

If the designation school is the dharma of the Buddhas and ancestors, it should be in the kingdom of the Buddha; if it is in the kingdom of the Buddha, the Buddha should preach it. The Buddha does not preach it. . . I beg of you, do not call [yourself] a school.

Pursue genuine training.

The sound of running water is Buddha's great speech.

Zazen is not thinking of good . . . Do not desire to become a Buddha . . . Be moderate in eating and drinking. Be mindful of the passing of time, and engage yourself in zazen

If the lord takes as wise and intelligent those praised by the worldly and takes as unworthy those reviled by the worldly, then the majority party will advance and the minority party will retreat.

Right and wrong are temporal, but time is neither right nor wrong. Right and wrong are the Dharma, but the Dharma is neither right nor wrong. In the balance of the Dharma, wrong is balanced. In the balance of the Dharma, right is balanced. And so, in learning of complete and utter Awakening, in hearing the Teachings, doing the training, and realizing the effect, this is profound, vast, and wonderful. Some hear of unsurpassed Awakening from good friends, and some hear of it from the sutras. What one hears first is, "Not doing wrong action." If one does not hear “not doing wrong action,” one is not hearing the Buddhas' true Dharma but demonic talk. Know that hearing “not doing wrong action” is hearing the Buddhas' true Dharma.

The true person is . . . like the deep blue colour of the limitless sky - everyone, everywhere in the world.

Zazen is the ultimate practice. This is indeed the True Self. The Buddhadharma is not to be sought outside of this.

If you only have wild grasses with which to make a broth, do not disdain them.

Author Picture
First Name
Dōgen, aka Dōgen Kigen, Eihei Dōgen, titled as Dōgen Zenji
Birth Date
1200
Death Date
1253
Bio

Japanese Zen Monk, Zen Buddhist Teacher and Founder of the Soto School of Zen in Japan. "Zenji" is a title meaning zen master, and the name Dogen means roughly "Source of the Way"