Desmond Tutu, fully Desmond Mpilo Tutu

Desmond
Tutu, fully Desmond Mpilo Tutu
1931

South African Cleric and Anti-Apartheid Activist, First Black South African Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa, South African Civil Rights Leader, Nobel Prize Winner, Anglican Archbishop, Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism, Gandhi Peace Prize, Presidential Medal of Freedom

Author Quotes

I give great thanks to God that he has created a Dalai Lama. Do you really think, as some have argued, that God will be saying: You know, that guy, the Dalai Lama, is not bad. What a pity he's not a Christian? I don't think that is the case — because, you see, God is not a Christian.

In my country of South Africa, we struggled for years against the evil system of apartheid that divided human beings, children of the same God, by racial classification and then denied many of them fundamental human rights.

It may be a procession of faithful failures that enriches the soil of godly success.

Reconciliation is a long process. We don't have the kind of race clashes that we thought would happen. What we have is xenophobia, and it's very distressing. But maybe you ought to be lenient with us. We've been free for just 12 years.

Though wrong gratifies in the moment, good yields its gifts over a lifetime.

We would like to see you departing peacefully.

Dear Child of God, I write these words because we all experience sadness, we all come at times to despair, and we all lose hope that the suffering in our lives and in the world will ever end. I want to share with you my faith and my understanding that this suffering can be transformed and redeemed. There is no such thing as a totally hopeless case. Our God is an expert at dealing with chaos, with brokenness, with all the worst that we can imagine. God created order out of disorder, cosmos out of chaos, and God can do so always, can do so now--in our personal lives and in our lives as nations, globally. ... Indeed, God is transforming the world now--through us--because God loves us.

God's love is too great to be confined to any one side of a conflict or to any one religion.

I have been to the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and I have witnessed the racially segregated roads and housing that reminded me so much of the conditions we experienced in South Africa under the racist system of Apartheid.

In our struggle against apartheid, the great supporters were Jewish people. They almost instinctively had to be on the side of the disenfranchised, of the voiceless ones, fighting injustice, oppression and evil. I have continued to feel strongly with the Jews. I am patron of a Holocaust centre in South Africa. I believe Israel has a right to secure borders. What is not so understandable, not justified, is what it did to another people to guarantee its existence. I've been very deeply distressed in my visit to the Holy Land; it reminded me so much of what happened to us black people in South Africa.

It was relatively easy, we now realize, to categorize countries and nations. You knew who your enemies were and whom you could count on as collaborators and friends. And even more importantly, you had ready-made scapegoats to take the blame when things were going wrong.

Religion is like a knife: you can either use it to cut bread, or stick in someone's back.

Ubuntu is very difficult to render into a Western language... It is to say, 'My humanity is caught up, is inextricably bound up, in what is yours.'

What an awful blot on our copy book. Do we really care about human rights, do we care that people of flesh and blood, fellow Africans, are being treated like rubbish, almost worse than they were ever treated by rabid racists?

Differences are not intended to separate, to alienate. We are different precisely in order to realize our need of one another.

Good is stronger than evil; love is stronger than hate; light is stronger than darkness; life is stronger than death. Victory is ours, through him who loves us.

I long and work for a South Africa that is more open and more just; Where people count and where they have equal access to the good things of life; With equal opportunity to live, work and learn.

In South Africa, we could not have achieved our freedom and just peace without the help of people around the world, who through the use of non-violent means, such as boycotts and divestment, encouraged their governments and other corporate actors to reverse decades-long support for the Apartheid regime.

It's a blessing that South Africa has a man like Nelson Mandela.

Resentment and anger are bad for your blood pressure and your digestion.

Universal education is not only a moral imperative but an economic necessity, to pave the way toward making many more nations self-sufficient and self-sustaining.

What has happened to us? It seems as if we have perverted our freedom, our rights into license, into being irresponsible. Perhaps we did not realise just how apartheid has damaged us so that we seem to have lost our sense of right and wrong.

Don't raise your voice, improve your argument.

Hate has no place in the house of God.

I mean in the South African case, many of those who were part of death squads would have been respectable members of their white community, people who went to church on Sunday, every Sunday.

Author Picture
First Name
Desmond
Last Name
Tutu, fully Desmond Mpilo Tutu
Birth Date
1931
Bio

South African Cleric and Anti-Apartheid Activist, First Black South African Anglican Archbishop of Cape Town, South Africa, South African Civil Rights Leader, Nobel Prize Winner, Anglican Archbishop, Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism, Gandhi Peace Prize, Presidential Medal of Freedom