Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, fully Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton

Edward
Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, fully Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton
1803
1873

English Novelist, Politician, Poet, and Playwright, Secretary of State for the Colonies

Author Quotes

Man is arrogant in proportion to his ignorance. Man’s natural tendency is to egotism. Man, in his infancy of knowledge, thinks that all creation was formed for him.

Love is rarely a hypocrite; but hate - how detect and how guard against it! It lurks where you least expect it; it is created by causes that you can the least foresee; and civilization multiplies its varieties, whilst it favors its disguise.

Life is short - while we speak it flies; enjoy, then, the present, and forget the future; such is the moral of ancient poetry, a graceful and a wise moral - indulged beneath a southern sky, and all deserving the phrase applied to it, “The philosophy of the garden.”

It is noticeable how intuitively in age we go back with strange fondness to all that is fresh in the earliest dawn of youth. If we never cared for little children before, we delight to see them roll in the grass over which we hobble on crutches. The grandsire turns wearily from his middle-aged, care-worn son, to listen with infant laugh to the prattle of an infant grandchild. It is the old who plant young trees; it is the old who are most saddened by the autumn, and feel most delight in the returning spring.

It is not the deed - it is the will.

It is astonishing how well men wear when they think of no one but themselves.

In early youth, if we find it difficult to control our feelings, so we find it difficult to vent them in the presence of others. On the spring side of twenty, if anything affects us, we rush to lock ourselves up in our room, or get away into the street or the fields; in our earlier years we are still the savages of nature, and we do as the poor brutes do. The wounded stag leaves the herd; and if there is anything on a dog’s faithful heart, he slinks away into a corner.

If there is a virtue in the world at which we should always aim, it is cheerfulness.

He who seeks repentance for the past, should woo the angel virtue for the future.

He never errs who sacrifices self.

Every man who observes vigilantly and resolves steadfastly grows unconsciously into genius.

Enthusiasm is the genius of sincerity, and truth accomplishes not victories without it.

Earnest men never think in vain, though their thoughts may be errors.

Arm thyself for the truth!

And whatever you lend, let it be your money, and not your name. Money you may get again, and, if not, you may contrive to do without it; name, once lost you cannot get again, and, if you can contrive to do without it, you had better never have been born.

Ambition has not rest!

Ah, what without a heaven would be even love! A perpetual terror of the separation that must one day come.

A good heart is better than all the heads in the world.

A fool flatters himself, a wise man flatters the fool.

The main reason why silence is so efficacious an element of repute is, first, because of that magnification which proverbially belongs to the unknown; and, secondly, because silence provokes no man's envy, and wounds no man's self-love.

There is not so agonizing a feeling in the whole catalogue of human suffering, as the first conviction that the heart of the being whom we most tenderly love is estranged from us.

Wherever progress ends, decline in variably begins; but remember that the healthful progress of society is like the natural life of man - it consists in the gradual and harmonious development of all its constitutional powers, all its component parts, and you introduce weakness and disease into the whole system whether you attempt to stint or to force its growth.

The man who has acquired the habit of study, though for only one hour every day in the year, and keeps to the one thing studied till it is mastered, will be startled to see the way he has made at the end of a twelvemonth.

There is one way of attaining what we may term, if not utter, at least mortal happiness; it is by a sincere and unrelaxing activity for the happiness of others.

Will our souls, hurrying on in diverse paths, unite once more, as if the interval had been a dream?

Author Picture
First Name
Edward
Last Name
Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, fully Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton
Birth Date
1803
Death Date
1873
Bio

English Novelist, Politician, Poet, and Playwright, Secretary of State for the Colonies