Edward Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, fully Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton

Edward
Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, fully Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton
1803
1873

English Novelist, Politician, Poet, and Playwright, Secretary of State for the Colonies

Author Quotes

It is not by gray of the hair that one knows the age of the heart.

Philosophers have done wisely when they have told us to cultivate our reason rather than our feelings, for reason reconciles us to the daily things of existence; our feelings teach us to yearn after the far, the difficult, the unseen.

Art itself is essentially ethical; because every true work of art must have a beauty and grandeur cannot be comprehended by the beholder except through the moral sentiment. The eye is only a witness; it is not a judge. The mind judges what the eye reports to it; therefore, whatever elevates the moral sentiment to the contemplation of beauty and grandeur is in itself ethical.

Happiness and virtue rest upon each other; the best are not only the happiest, but the happiest are usually the best.

It is not wisdom but ignorance that teaches men presumption. Genius may sometimes be arrogant, but nothing is so diffident as knowledge.

Philosophy, while it soothes the reason, damps the ambition.

Beneath the rule of men entirely great, the pen is mightier than the sword.

He that fancies himself very enlightened, because he sees the deficiencies of others, may be very ignorant, because he has not studied his own.

"Know thyself," said the old philosopher, "improve thyself," saith the new. Our great object in time is not to waste our passions and gifts on the things external that we must leave behind, but that we cultivate within us all that we can carry into the eternal progress beyond.

Poets alone are sure of immortality; they are the truest diviners of nature.

Better than fame is still the wish for fame, the constant training for glorious strife.

He who esteems trifles for themselves is a trifler; he who esteems them for the conclusions to be drawn from them, or the advantage to which they can be put, is a philosopher.

Life consists in the alternate process of learning and unlearning, but it is often wiser to unlearn than to learn.

Political freedom is, or ought to be, the best guaranty for the safety and continuance of spiritual, mental, and civil freedom. It is the combination of numbers to secure the liberty to each one.

Books are but waste paper unless we spend in action the wisdom we get from thought.

He who sees his heir in his own child, carries his eye over hopes and possessions lying far beyond his gravestone, viewing his life, even here, as a period but closed with a comma. He who sees his heir in another man’s child sees the full stop at the end of the sentence.

Life, that ever needs forgiveness, has, for its first duty, to forgive.

Power is so characteristically calm that calmness in itself has the aspect of power, and forbearance implies strength. The orator who is known to have at his command all the weapons of invective is most formidable when most courteous.

Business dispatched is business well done, but business hurried is business ill done.

Hope nothing from luck, and probability is that you will be so prepared, forewarned, and forearmed, that all shallow observers will call you lucky.

Love is the business of the idle, but the idleness of the busy.

Reading without purpose is sauntering, not exercise. More is got from one book on which the thought settles for definite end in knowledge, than from libraries skimmed over by a wandering eye.

Character is money; and according as the man earns or spends the money, money in turn becomes character. As money is the most evident power in the world’s uses, so the use that he makes of money is often all that the world knows about a man.

Hope warps judgment in council, but quickens energy in action.

Money never can be well managed if sought solely through the greed of money for its own sake. In all meanness there is a defect of intellect as well as of heart. And event he cleverness of avarice is but the cunning of imbecility.

Author Picture
First Name
Edward
Last Name
Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton, fully Edward George Earle Lytton Bulwer-Lytton, Lord Lytton
Birth Date
1803
Death Date
1873
Bio

English Novelist, Politician, Poet, and Playwright, Secretary of State for the Colonies