Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Elizabeth Cady
Stanton
1815
1902

American Abolitionist, Leader of Women's Rights Movement

Author Quotes

To throw obstacles in the way of a complete education is like putting out the eyes.

To-day the woman is Mrs. Richard Roe, to-morrow Mrs. John Doe, and again Mrs. James Smith according as she changes masters, and she has so little self-respect that she does not see the insult of the custom.

Truth is the only safe ground to stand upon.

We are the only class in history that has been left to fight its battles alone, unaided by the ruling powers. White labor and the freed black men had their champions, but where are ours?

We found nothing grand in the history of the Jews nor in the morals inculcated in the Pentateuch. I know of no other books that so fully teach the subjection and degradation of woman.

Whatever the theories may be of woman's dependence on man, in the supreme moments of her life he cannot bear her burdens.

The woman is uniformly sacrificed to the wife and mother.

When we consider that women are treated as property it is degrading to women that we should treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit.

There is a solitude, which each and every one of us has always carried with him, more inaccessible than the ice-cold mountains, more profound than the midnight sea; the solitude of self. Our inner being, which we call ourself, no eye nor touch of man or angel has ever pierced.

When women understand that governments and religions are human inventions; that bibles, prayer-books, catechisms, and encyclical letters are all emanations from the brain of man, they will no longer be oppressed by the injunctions that come to them with the divine authority of 'thus saith the Lord.

Think of the inconvenience of vanishing as it were from your friends and, correspondents three times in one's natural life.

With age come the inner, the higher life. Who would be forever young, to dwell always in externals?

Though woman needs the protection of one man against his whole sex, in pioneer life, in threading her way through a lonely forest, on the highway, or in the streets of the metropolis on a dark night, she sometimes needs, too, the protection of all men against this one.

Woman will always be dependent until she holds a purse of her own.

Through the protracted and disgraceful assault on American womanhood the clergy baptized each new insult and act of injustice in the name of the Christian religion, and uniformly asked God's blessing on proceedings that would put to shame an assembly of Hottentots.

Woman's degradation is in man’s idea of his sexual rights. Our religion, laws, customs, are all founded on the belief that woman was made for man.

Thus far, women have been the mere echoes of men. Our laws and constitutions, our creeds and codes, and the customs of social life are all of masculine origin. The true woman is as yet a dream of the future.

Woman's discontent increases in exact proportion to her development.

To live for a principle, for the triumph of some reform by which all mankind are to be lifted up to be wedded to an idea may be, after all, the holiest and happiest of marriages.

Women have crucified the Mary Wollstonecrafts, the Fanny Wrights, and the George Sands of all ages. Men mock us with the fact and say we are ever cruel to each other.

To make laws that man cannot, and will not obey, serves to bring all law into contempt.

Women of all classes are awakening to the necessity of self-support, but few are willing to do the ordinary useful work for which they are fitted.

To no form of religion is woman indebted for one impulse of freedom, as all alike have taught her inferiority and subjection.

Words cannot describe the indignation a proud woman feels for her sex in disfranchisement.

To refuse political equality is to rob the ostracized of all self-respect.

Author Picture
First Name
Elizabeth Cady
Last Name
Stanton
Birth Date
1815
Death Date
1902
Bio

American Abolitionist, Leader of Women's Rights Movement