Ezra Pound, fully Ezra Weston Loomis Pound

Ezra
Pound, fully Ezra Weston Loomis Pound
1885
1972

American Expatriate Poet and Critic

Author Quotes

And the days are not full enough and the nights are not full enough and life slips by like a field mouse not shaking the grass

Fundamental accuracy of statement is the ONE sole morality of writing.

I have always thought the suicide should bump off at least one swine before taking off for parts unknown.

It is better to present one image in a lifetime than to produce voluminous work.

My pawing over the ancients and semi-ancients has been one struggle to find out what has been done, once and for all, better than it can ever be done again, and to find out what remains for us to do, and plenty does remain, for if we still feel the same emotions as those who launched a thousand ships, it is quite certain that we came on these feelings differently, through different nuances, by different intellectual gradations. Each age has its own abounding gifts yet only some ages transmute them into matters of duration.

Properly, we should read for power. Man reading should be man intensely alive. The book should be a ball of light in one's hand.

The curse of me and my nation is that we always think things can be bettered by immediate action of some sort, any sort rather than no sort.

The serious artist must be as open as nature. Nature does not give all of herself in a paragraph. She is rugged and not set apart into discreet categories.

Utter originality is, of course, out of the question

Your interest is in the bloody loam but what I'm after is the finished product.

And the good writer chooses his words for their 'meaning', but that meaning is not a a set, cut-off thing like the move of knight or pawn on a chess-board. It comes up with roots, with associations, with how and where the word is familiarly used, or where it has been used brilliantly or memorably.

Glance is the enemy of vision.

I have never known anyone worth a damn who wasn't irascible.

It is difficult to write a paradiso when all the superficial indications are that you ought to write an apocalypse. It is obviously much easier to find inhabitants for an inferno or even a purgatorio.

My worst mistake was the stupid suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism, all along that spoiled everything.

Religion, oh, just another of those numerous failures resulting from an attempt to popularize art.

The eyes of this dead lady speak to me for here was love, was not to be drowned out. And here desire, not to be kissed away. The eyes of this dead lady speak to me.

The temple is holy because it is not for sale.

Wars are made to make debt.

And we have friends and no butlers.

Gloom and solemnity are entirely out of place in even the most rigorous study of an art originally intended to make glad the heart of man.

I have tried to write Paradise. Do not move. Let the wind speak. That is paradise. Let the Gods forgive what I have made. Let those I love try to forgive what I have made.

It is more than likely that the brain itself is, in origin and development, only a sort of great clot of genital fluid held in suspense or reserved. This hypothesis would explain the enormous content of the brain as a maker or presenter of images.

No good poetry is ever written in a manner twenty years old, for to write in such a manner shows conclusively that the writer thinks from books, convention and cliché, not from real life.

Rhythm must have meaning.

Author Picture
First Name
Ezra
Last Name
Pound, fully Ezra Weston Loomis Pound
Birth Date
1885
Death Date
1972
Bio

American Expatriate Poet and Critic