François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

When we exaggerate the tenderness of our friends towards us, it is often less from gratitude than from a desire to exhibit our own merit.

Youth changes its inclinations through heat of blood; old age perseveres in them through the power of habit.

When we seek reconciliation with our enemies, it is commonly out of a desire to better our own condition, a being harassed and tired out with a state of war, and a fear of some ill accident which we are willing to prevent.

Youth changes its tastes by the warmth of its blood; age retains its tastes by habit.

We have more than laziness in mind that in the body.

We often forgive those who bore us, but cannot forgive those we bore.

We should often be ashamed of our finest actions if the world understood all the motives behind them.

What is commonly called friendship is no more than a partnership; a reciprocal regard for one another's interests, and an exchange of good offices; in a word, a mere traffic, wherein self-love always proposes to be a gainer.

Whatever disgrace we may have deserved, it is almost always in our power to re-establish our character.

We have no patience with other people's vanity because it is offensive to our own.

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore.

We should scarcely desire things ardently if we were perfectly acquainted with what we desire.

What is perfectly true is perfectly witty.

Whatever distrust we may have of the sincerity of those who converse with us, we always believe they will tell us more truth than they do to others.

We like to divine others, but do not like to be divined ourselves.

We often pardon those that annoy us, but we cannot pardon those we annoy.

We should wish for few things with eagerness, if we perfectly knew the nature of that which was the object of our desire.

What keeps us from abandoning ourselves entirely to one vice, often, is the fact that we have several.

Whatever good things people say of us, they tell us nothing new.

We like to see others, but don't like others to see through us.

We often pass from love to ambition, but we hardly ever pass from ambition to love.

We sometimes see a fool possessed of talent, but never of judgment.

What makes false reckoning, as regards gratitude, is that the pride of the giver and the receiver cannot agree as to the value of the benefit.

Whatever ignominy or disgrace we have incurred, it is almost always in our power to reestablish our reputation.

We love everything on our own account; we even follow our own taste and inclination when we prefer our friends to ourselves; and yet it is this preference alone that constitutes true and perfect friendship.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs