François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

We seldom find people ungrateful so long as it is thought we can serve them.

What causes such a miscalculation in the amount of gratitude which men expect for the favors they have done, is, that the pride of the giver and that of the receiver can never agree as to the value of the benefit.

Whatever difference may appear in the fortunes of mankind, there is, nevertheless, a certain compensation of good and evil which makes them equal.

We often console ourselves for being unhappy by a certain pleasure in appearing so.

We seldom find persons whom we acknowledge to be possessed of good sense, except those who agree with us in opinion.

What causes us to like new acquaintances is not so much weariness of our old ones, or the pleasure of change, as disgust at not being sufficiently admired by those who know us too well, and the hope of being admired more by those who do not know so much about us.

Whatever discoveries we may have made in the regions of self-love, there still remain many unknown lands.

We have more strength than will; and it is often merely for an excuse we say things are impossible.

We often do good in order that we may do evil with impunity.

We seldom praise anyone in good earnest, except such as admire us.

What is called generosity is usually only the vanity of giving; we enjoy the vanity more than the thing given.

Whatever disgrace we may have deserved or incurred, it is almost always in our power to re-establish our character.

We have more than laziness in mind that in the body.

We often forgive those who bore us, but cannot forgive those we bore.

We should often be ashamed of our finest actions if the world understood all the motives behind them.

What is commonly called friendship is no more than a partnership; a reciprocal regard for one another's interests, and an exchange of good offices; in a word, a mere traffic, wherein self-love always proposes to be a gainer.

Whatever disgrace we may have deserved, it is almost always in our power to re-establish our character.

We have no patience with other people's vanity because it is offensive to our own.

We often forgive those who bore us, but we cannot forgive those whom we bore.

We should scarcely desire things ardently if we were perfectly acquainted with what we desire.

What is perfectly true is perfectly witty.

Whatever distrust we may have of the sincerity of those who converse with us, we always believe they will tell us more truth than they do to others.

We like to divine others, but do not like to be divined ourselves.

We often pardon those that annoy us, but we cannot pardon those we annoy.

We should wish for few things with eagerness, if we perfectly knew the nature of that which was the object of our desire.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs