François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

We may forgive those who bore us, we cannot forgive those whom we bore.

We pardon to the extent that we love.

We would frequently be ashamed of our good deeds if people saw all of the motives that produced them.

What makes us so bitter against people who outwit us is that they think themselves cleverer than we are.

We may say of agreeableness, as distinct from beauty, that it consists in a symmetry of which we know not the rules, and a secret conformity of the features to each other, as also to the air and complexion of the person.

We promise according to our hopes, but perform according to our selfishness and our fears.

We would often be ashamed of our best actions if the world only knew the motives behind them.

What makes vanity so insufferable to us, is that it hurts our own.

We may seem great in an employment below our worth, but we very often look little in one that is too big for us.

We rarely think people have good sense unless they agree with us.

Weakness is more opposed to virtue than is vice.

What men have called friendship is only a social arrangement, a mutual adjustment of interests, an interchange of services given and received; it is, in sum, simply a business from which those involved propose to derive a steady profit for their own self-love.

We may sooner be brought to love them that hate us, than them that love us more than we would have them do.

We say little if not egged on by vanity.

Weakness is the only fault that is incorrigible.

What often prevents our abandoning ourselves to a single vice is, our having more than one.

We must not judge of a man's merits by his great qualities, but by the use he makes of them.

We say little, when vanity does not make us speak.

Were we faultless, we would not derive such satisfaction from remarking the faults of others.

What seems generosity is often disguised ambition, that despises small to run after greater interests.

We need greater virtues to sustain good than evil fortune.

We seldom attribute common sense except to those who agree with us.

Were we perfectly acquainted with the object, we should never passionately desire it.

What seems to be generosity is often no more than disguised ambition, which overlooks a small interest in order to secure a great one.

There are good marriages, but there are no delightful ones.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs