François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

There is a kind of elevation which does not depend on fortune. It is a certain air which distinguishes us, and seems to destine us for great things; it is a price which we imperceptibly set on ourselves. By this quality we usurp the deference of other men; and it puts us, in general, more above them than birth, dignity, or even merit itself.

There is nothing men are so generous of as advice.

Those whom the world has delighted to honor have oftener been influenced in their doings by ambition and vanity than by patriotism.

Tricks and treachery are merely proofs of lack of skill.

We are lazier in our minds than in our bodies.

We confess our faults, in order that our frankness may repair the damage they do us in the eyes of others.

We have all of us sufficient fortitude to bear the misfortunes of others.

There are heroes in evil as well as in good.

There is a season for man's merit as well as for fruit.

There is only one kind of love, but it has a thousand guises.

Though men are apt to flatter and exalt themselves with their great achievements, yet these are, in truth, very often owing not so much to design as chance.

True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and nothing but what is necessary.

We are more interested in making others believe we are happy than in trying to be happy ourselves.

We confess our little faults to persuade ourselves we have no great ones.

We have more ability than will power, and it is often an excuse to ourselves that we imagine that things are impossible.

There are many women who never have had one intrigue; but there are few who have had only one.

There is an eloquent silence which serves to approve or to condemn: there is a silence of discretion and of respect.

There is only one kind of love, but there are a thousand different versions.

Though nature be ever so generous, yet can she not make a hero alone. Fortune must contribute her part too; and till both concur, the work cannot be perfected.

True eloquence consists in saying all that is proper, and nothing more.

We are more often treacherous, through weakness than through calculation.

We credit scarcely any persons with good sense except those who are of our opinion.

We have more indolence in the mind than in the body.

There are more defects in temperament than in the mind.

There is an eloquent silence, which serves sometimes to approve, sometimes to condemn.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs