François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and nothing but what is necessary.

We are more interested in making others believe we are happy than in trying to be happy ourselves.

We confess our little faults to persuade ourselves we have no great ones.

We have more ability than will power, and it is often an excuse to ourselves that we imagine that things are impossible.

There are many women who never have had one intrigue; but there are few who have had only one.

There is an eloquent silence which serves to approve or to condemn: there is a silence of discretion and of respect.

There is only one kind of love, but there are a thousand different versions.

Though nature be ever so generous, yet can she not make a hero alone. Fortune must contribute her part too; and till both concur, the work cannot be perfected.

True eloquence consists in saying all that is proper, and nothing more.

We are more often treacherous, through weakness than through calculation.

We credit scarcely any persons with good sense except those who are of our opinion.

We have more indolence in the mind than in the body.

There are more defects in temperament than in the mind.

There is an eloquent silence, which serves sometimes to approve, sometimes to condemn.

There is only one kind of love, but there are a thousand imitations.

Time's chariot-wheels make their carriage-road in the fairest face.

True eloquence consists in saying all that should be said, and that only.

We are never either so fortunate or so misfortunate as we imagine.

We do not despise all those who have vices, but we despise all those who have not a single virtue.

There are no accidents so unfortunate from which skillful men will not draw some advantage, nor so fortunate that foolish men will not turn them to their hurt.

There is as much eloquence in the tone of voice, in the eyes, and in the air of a speaker as in his choice of words.

There is such a thing as a general revolution which changes the taste of men as it changes the fortunes of the world.

Timidity is a fault for which it is dangerous to reprove persons whom we wish to correct of it.

True love is like the appearance of ghosts; everyone talks about it but few have seen it.

We are never so happy or unhappy as we think.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs