François de La Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt

François de La
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
1613
1680

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs

Author Quotes

There are very few things impossible in themselves; and we do not want means to conquer difficulties so much as application and resolution in the use of means.

There is no praise we have not lavished upon prudence; and yet she cannot assure to us the most trifling event.

Those who have had great passions often find all their lives made miserable in being cured of them.

To safeguard one's health at the cost of too strict a diet is a tiresome illness indeed.

We are almost always wearied in the company of persons with whom we are not permitted to be weary.

We can be more clever than one, but not more clever than all.

We give advice, but we do not inspire conduct.

There are follies as catching as contagious disorders.

There are very few women in society whose virtue outlasts their beauty.

There is no use being young without being beautiful, and no use being beautiful without being young.

Those who most obstinately oppose the most widely-held opinions more often do so because of pride than lack of intelligence. They find the best places in the right set already taken, and they do not want back seats.

Too great haste to repay an obligation is a kind of ingratitude.

We are eager to believe that others are flawed because we are eager to believe in what we wish for.

We can never be certain of our courage until we have faced danger.

We give nothing so freely as advice.

There are good marriages, but no delicious ones.

There are ways which lead to everything, and if we have sufficient will we should always have sufficient means.

There is not less eloquence in the voice, the eye, the gesture, than in words.

Those who occupy their minds with small matters, generally become incapable of greatness.

Too great refinement is false delicacy, and true delicacy is solid refinement.

We are easily comforted for the misfortunes of our friends, when those misfortunes give us an occasion of expressing our affection and solicitude.

We come altogether fresh and raw into the several stages of life, and often find ourselves without experience, despite our years.

We hardly find any persons of good sense save those who agree with us.

Tastes in young people are changed by natural impetuosity, and in the aged are preserved by habit.

The defects of the understanding, like those of the face, grow worse as we grow old.

First Name
François de La
Last Name
Rochefoucauld, François VI, Duc de La Rochefoucauld, Prince de Marcillac, Francois A. F. Rochefoucauld-Liancourt
Birth Date
1613
Death Date
1680
Bio

French Courtier, Moralist, Writer of Maxims and Memoirs