François Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon

François
Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon
1651
1715

French Roman Catholic Archbishop, Theologian, Poet, Prelate and Writer

Author Quotes

A good discourse is that from which one can take nothing without taking the life.

God works in a mysterious way in grace as well as in nature, concealing His operations under an imperceptible succession of events, and thus keeps us always in the darkness of faith.

It is only by fidelity in little things that the grace of true love to God can be sustained, and distinguished from a passing fervor of spirit. . . . No one can well believe that our piety is sincere, when our behavior is lax and irregular in its little details. What probability is there that we should not hesitate to make the greatest sacrifices, when we shrink from the smallest?

Prayer is so necessary, and the source of so many blessings, that he who has discovered the treasure cannot be prevented from having recourse to it, whenever he has an opportunity.

The past but lives in written words: a thousand ages were blank if books had not evoked their ghosts, and kept the pale unbodied shades to warn us from fleshless lips.

To realize God's presence is the one sovereign remedy against temptation.

A good historian is timeless; although he is a patriot, he will never flatter his country in any respect.

God's treasury where He keeps His children's gifts will be like many a mother's store of relics of her children, full of things of no value to others, but precious in His eyes for the love's sake that was in them.

It is the misfortune of kings that they scarcely ever do the good they have a mind to do; and through surprise, and the insinuations of flatterers, they often do the mischief they never intended.

Real friends are our greatest joy and our greatest sorrow. It were almost to be wished that all true and faithful friends should expire on the same day.

The presence God calms the soul, and gives it quiet and repose.

Trouble and perplexity drive me to prayer, and prayer drives away perplexity and trouble.

A man's style is nearly as much a part of himself as his face, or figure, or the throbbing of his pulse; in short, as any part of his being which is subjected to the action of his will.

Good taste rejects excessive nicety; it treats little things as little things, and is not hurt by them.

Let the water flow beneath the bridge; let men be men, that is to say, weak, vain, inconstant, unjust, false, and presumptuous; let the world be the world still; you cannot prevent it. Let everyone follow his own inclination and habits; you cannot recast them, and the best course is, to let them be as they are and bear with them. Do not think it strange when you witness unreasonableness and injustice; rest in peace in the bosom of God; He sees it all more clearly than you do, and yet permits it. Be content to do quietly and gently what it becomes you to do, and let everything else be to you as though it were not.

Resign every forbidden joy; restrain every wish that is not referred to God's will; banish all eager desires, all anxiety; desire only the will of God; seek him alone and supremely, and you will find peace.

The realization of God's presence is the one sovereign remedy against temptation.

Violent excitement exhausts the mind, and leaves it withered and sterile.

All earthly delights are sweeter in expectation than in enjoyment; but all spiritual pleasures more in fruition than in expectation.

Had we not faults of our own, we should take less pleasure in complaining of others.

Let us often think of our own infirmities, and we shall become indulgent toward those of others.

Should we feel at times disheartened and discouraged, a confiding thought, a simple movement of heart towards God will renew our powers. Whatever He may demand of us, He will give us at the moment the strength and the courage that we need.

The smallest things become great when God requires them of us; they are small only in themselves; they are always great when they are done for God.

We can often do more for other men by trying to correct our own faults than by trying to correct theirs.

As the reflections of our pride upon our defects are bitter, disheartening, and vexatious, so the return of the soul towards God is peaceful and sustained by confidence. You will find by experience how much more your progress will be aided by this simple, peaceful turning towards God, than by all your chagrin and spite at the faults that exist in you.

Author Picture
First Name
François
Last Name
Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon
Birth Date
1651
Death Date
1715
Bio

French Roman Catholic Archbishop, Theologian, Poet, Prelate and Writer