François Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon

François
Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon
1651
1715

French Roman Catholic Archbishop, Theologian, Poet, Prelate and Writer

Author Quotes

Faith is letting down our nets into the transparent deeps at the Divine command, not knowing what we shall draw.

I would have no desire other than to accomplish thy will. Teach me to pray; pray thyself in me.

No more restless uncertainties, no more anxious desires, no more impatience at the place we are in; for it is God who has placed us there, and who holds us in his arms. Can we be unsafe where he has placed us?

The history of the world suggests that without love of God there is little likelihood of a love for man that does not become corrupt.

This poor world, the object of so much insane attachment, we are about to leave; it is but misery, vanity, and folly; a phantom--the very fashion of which "passeth away."

Genuine good taste consists in saying much in few words, in choosing among our thoughts, in having order and arrangement in what we say, and in speaking with composure.

If all the crowns of Europe were placed at my disposal on condition that I should abandon my books and studies, I should spurn the crowns away and stand by the books.

Nothing is more despicable than a professional talker who uses his words as a quack uses his remedies.

The kingdom of God which is within us consists in our willing whatever God wills, always, in everything, and without reservation; and thus His kingdom comes; for His will is then done as it is in heaven, since we will nothing but what is dictated by His sovereign pleasure.

Time spent in prayer is never wasted.

God has not chosen to save us without crosses; as He has not seen fit to create men at once in the full vigor of manhood, but has suffered them to grow up by degrees amid all the perils and weaknesses of youth.

If the crowns of all the kingdoms of Europe were laid down at my feet in exchange for my books and my love of reading, I would spurn them all.

O Lord, I do most cheerfully commit all unto Thee.

The most essential point is lowliness.

To be content with even the best people, we must be contented with little and bear a great deal. Those who are most perfect have many imperfections, and we have great faults; between the two, mutual toleration becomes very difficult.

A cross borne in simplicity, without the interference of self-love to augment it, is only half a cross. Suffering in this simplicity of love, we are not only happy in spite of the cross, but because of it; for love is pleased in suffering for the Well Beloved, and the cross which forms us into His image is a consoling bond of love.

God never makes us sensible of our weakness except to give us of His strength.

If we die in part every day of our lives, we shall have but little to do on the last. O how utterly will these little daily deaths destroy the power of the final dying!

Oh! how seldom the soul is silent, in order that God may speak.

The most virtuous of all men, says Plato, is he that contents himself with being virtuous without seeking to appear so.

To pray. . . is to desire; but it is to desire what God would have us desire. He who desires not from the bottom of his heart, offers a deceitful prayer.

A good discourse is that from which one can take nothing without taking the life.

God works in a mysterious way in grace as well as in nature, concealing His operations under an imperceptible succession of events, and thus keeps us always in the darkness of faith.

It is only by fidelity in little things that the grace of true love to God can be sustained, and distinguished from a passing fervor of spirit. . . . No one can well believe that our piety is sincere, when our behavior is lax and irregular in its little details. What probability is there that we should not hesitate to make the greatest sacrifices, when we shrink from the smallest?

Prayer is so necessary, and the source of so many blessings, that he who has discovered the treasure cannot be prevented from having recourse to it, whenever he has an opportunity.

Author Picture
First Name
François
Last Name
Fénelon, fully Francois de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon
Birth Date
1651
Death Date
1715
Bio

French Roman Catholic Archbishop, Theologian, Poet, Prelate and Writer