François-René de Chateaubriand, fully François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand

François-René de
Chateaubriand, fully François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand
1768
1848

French Writer, Statesman, Politician and Historian

Author Quotes

My childhood’s home, that pleasant spot by me can never be forgot! How happy, sister, then appeared

One inhabits, with a full heart, an empty world.

Something you consider bad may bring out your child's talents; something you consider good may stifle them.

The conflagration spread like a flaming garland.

The scenes of tomorrow no longer concern me; they call for other artists: your turn, gentlemen!

There is nothing beautiful or sweet or great in life that is not mysterious.

Washington and Bonaparte emerged from the womb of democracy: both of them born to liberty, the former remained faithful to her, the latter betrayed her.

Washington has left the United States behind for a monument on the field of battle. Bonaparte shared no trait with that serious American: he fought amidst thunder in an old world; he thought about nothing but creating his own fame; he was inspired only by his own fate. He seemed to know that his project would be short, that the torrent which falls from such heights flows swiftly; he hastened to enjoy and abuse his glory, like fleeting youth. Following the example of Homer’s gods, in four paces he reached the ends of the world. He appeared on every shore; he wrote his name hurriedly in the annals of every people; he threw royal crowns to his family and his generals; he hurried through his monuments, his laws, his victories. Leaning over the world, with one hand he deposed kings, with the other he pulled down the giant, Revolution; but, in eliminating anarchy, he stifled liberty, and ended by losing his own on his last field of battle. Each was rewarded according to his efforts: Washington brings a nation to independence; a justice at peace, he falls asleep beneath his own roof in the midst of his compatriots’ grief and the veneration of nations. Bonaparte robs a nation of its independence: deposed as emperor, he is sent into exile, where the world’s anxiety still does not think him safely enough imprisoned, guarded by the Ocean. He dies: the news proclaimed on the door of the palace in front of which the conqueror had announced so many funerals, neither detains nor astonishes the passer-by: what have the citizens to mourn? Washington’s Republic lives on; Bonaparte’s empire is destroyed. Washington and Bonaparte emerged from the womb of democracy: both of them born to liberty, the former remained faithful to her, the latter betrayed her. Washington acted as the representative of the needs, the ideas, the enlightened men, the opinions of his age; he supported, not thwarted, the stirrings of intellect; he desired only what he had to desire, the very thing to which he had been called: from which derives the coherence and longevity of his work. That man who struck few blows because he kept things in proportion has merged his existence with that of his country: his glory is the heritage of civilisation; his fame has risen like one of those public sanctuaries where a fecund and inexhaustible spring flows.

We are convinced that the great writers have told their own story in their works. One only truly describes one's own heart by attributing it to another, and the greater part of genius is composed of memories.

Every man carries within himself a world made up of all that he has seen and loved; and it is to this world that he returns, incessantly, though he may pass through and seem to inhabit a world quite foreign to it.

I behold the light of a dawn whose sunrise I shall never see. It only remains for me to sit down at the edge of my grave; then I shall descend boldly, crucifix in hand, into eternity.

I halt at the beginning of my travels, in Pennsylvania, in order to compare Washington and Bonaparte. I would rather not have concerned myself with them until the point where I had met Napoleon; but if I came to the edge of my grave without having reached the year 1814 in my tale, no one would then know anything of what I would have written concerning these two representatives of Providence. I remember Castelnau: like me Ambassador to England, who wrote like me a narrative of his life in London. On the last page of Book VII, he says to his son: ‘I will deal with this event in Book VIII,’ and Book VIII of Castelnau’s Memoirs does not exist: that warns me to take advantage of being alive.

I have made history, and been able to write it. ... Within and alongside my age, perhaps without wishing or seeking to, I have exerted upon it a triple influence, religious, political and literary.

It is a long way from Combourg to Berlin, from a youthful dreamer to an old minister. I find among the words preceding these: ‘In how many places have I already continued writing these Memoirs, and in what place will I finish them?'

Achilles exists only through Homer. Take away the art of writing from this world, and you will probably take away its glory.

It is genius that brings into being, and it is taste that preserves. Without taste genius is nought but sublime folly.

The most disastrous times have produced the greatest minds. The purest metal comes of the most ardent furnace the most brilliant lightning come of the darkest clouds.

An original writer is not one who imitates nobody, but one whom nobody can imitate.

It is necessary to repent for years in order to efface a fault in the eyes of men; a single tear suffices with God.

The original style is not the style which never borrows of any one, but that which no other person is capable of reproducing.

Are you angry? Look at the child who has erred, he suspects no trouble, he dreams of no harm; you will borrow something of that innocence, you will feel appeased.

It is with sorrows, as with countries, each man has his own.

The original writer is not he who refrains from imitating others, but he who can be imitated by none.

Aristocracy has three successive ages, — the age of superiorities, the age of privileges, and the age of vanities; having passed out of the first, it degenerates in the second, and dies away in the third.

Justice is the bread of the nation it is always hungry for it.

Author Picture
First Name
François-René de
Last Name
Chateaubriand, fully François-René, vicomte de Chateaubriand
Birth Date
1768
Death Date
1848
Bio

French Writer, Statesman, Politician and Historian