Frank Herbert, formally Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr.

Frank
Herbert, formally Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr.
1920
1986

American Science Fiction Writer, most notably the "Dune" series

Author Quotes

The day hums sweetly when you have enough bees working for you.

The mind can go either direction under stress—toward positive or toward negative: on or off. Think of it as a spectrum whose extremes are unconsciousness at the negative end and hyperconsciousness at the positive end. The way the mind will lean under stress is strongly influenced by training.

The people who can destroy a thing, they control it.

The stakes in conflict do not change. Battle determines who will control the wealth or its equivalent.

The way the mind will lean under stress is strongly influenced by training.

There is no escape - we pay for the violence of our ancestors.

There’s no secret to balance. You just have to feel the waves.

Think on it, Chani: the princess will have the name, yet she'll live as less than a concubine - never to know a moment of tenderness from the man to whom she's bound. While we, Chani, we who carry the name of concubine - history will call us wives.

To endure oneself may be the hardest task in the universe. You cannot hire a wise man or any other intellect to solve it for you. There's no writ of inquest or calling of witness to provide answers. No servant or disciple can dress the wound. You dress it yourself or continue bleeding for all to see.

Unused power was like a marionette with visible strings, nobody holding them. A compelling attraction: I could make it dance.

Sweet spring, full of sweet days and roses, a box where sweets compacted lie.

The dice cannot read their own spots.

The mind commands the body and it obeys. The mind orders itself and meets resistance.

The person who experiences greatness must have a feeling for the myth he is in. He must reflect what is projected upon him. And he must have a strong sense of the sardonic. This is what uncouples him from belief in his own pretensions. The sardonic is all that permits him to move within himself. Without this quality, even occasional greatness will destroy a man.

The surest way to keep a secret is to make people believe they already know the answer.

The whole theory of warfare is calculated risk, but when it comes to risking your own family, the element of calculation gets submerged in... other things.

There is no measuring Muad'Dib's motives by ordinary standards. In the moment of his triumph, he saw the death prepared for him, yet he accepted the treachery. Can you say he did this out of a sense of justice? Whose justice, then? Remember, we speak now of the Muad'Dib who ordered battle drums made from his enemies' skins, the Muad'Dib who denied the conventions of his ducal past with a wave of the hand, saying merely: 'I am the Kwisatz Haderach. That is reason enough.

There's a lesson in every temptation.

Think you of the fact that a deaf person cannot hear. Then, what deafness may we not all possess? What senses do we lack that we cannot see and cannot hear another world all around us?

To exist is to stand out, away from the background. You aren't thinking or really existing unless you're willing to risk even your own sanity in the judgment of your existence.

Use the first moments in study. You may miss many an opportunity for quick victory this way, but the moments of study are insurance of success. Take your time and be sure.

Sympathy for the enemy -- a weakness of police and armies alike. Most perilous are the unconscious sympathies directing you to preserve your enemy intact because the enemy is your justification for existence.

The difference between a good administrator and a bad one is about five heartbeats. Good administrators make immediate choices. Acceptable choices? They can usually be made to work. A bad administrator, on the other hand, hesitates, diddles around, asks for committees, for research and reports. Eventually he acts in ways which create serious problems...A bad administrator is more concerned with reports than decisions. He wants the hard record he can display as an excuse for his errors.And good administrators? Oh, they depend on verbal orders. They never lie about what they've done if their verbal orders cause problems, and they surround themselves with people able to act wisely on verbal orders. Often the most important piece of information is that something has gone wrong. Bad administrators hide their mistakes until it's too late to make corrections.Men of decision.One of the hardest things for a tyrant to find is people who actually make decisions... Most bureaucracies before mine sought out and promoted people who avoided decisions.

The mind goes on working no matter how we try to hold it back.

The person who takes the banal and ordinary and illuminates it in a new way can terrify. We do not want our ideas changed.

Author Picture
First Name
Frank
Last Name
Herbert, formally Franklin Patrick Herbert, Jr.
Birth Date
1920
Death Date
1986
Bio

American Science Fiction Writer, most notably the "Dune" series