Franklin D. Roosevelt, fully Franklin Delano Roosevelt, aka FDR

Franklin D.
Roosevelt, fully Franklin Delano Roosevelt, aka FDR
1882
1945

American Politician, 32nd President of the United States, only American President elected to more than two terms

Author Quotes

We know now that Government by organized money is just as dangerous as Government by organized mob.

Wealth in the modern world does not come merely from individual effort; it results from a combination of individual effort and of the manifold uses to which the community puts that effort. The individual does not create the product of his industry with his own hands; he utilizes the many processes and forces of mass production to meet the demands of a national and international market. Therefore, in spite of the great importance in our national life of the efforts and ingenuity of unusual individuals, the people in the mass have inevitably helped to make large fortunes possible. Without mass cooperation great accumulations of wealth would be impossible save by unhealthy speculation. AsAndrew Carnegie put it, "Where wealth accrues honorably, the people are always silent partners." Whether it be wealth achieved through the cooperation of the entire community or riches gained by speculation—in either case the ownership of such wealth or riches represents a great public interest and a great ability to pay.

We know that equality of individual ability has never existed and never will, but we do insist that equality of opportunity still must be sought.

When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.

We know that we still have far to go; that we must more greatly build the security and the opportunity and the knowledge of every citizen, in the measure justified by the resources and the capacity of the land.

When you see a rattlesnake poised to strike you, do not wait until he has struck before you crush him.

We look forward to a word founded upon four essential human freedoms. The first is freedom of speech and expression. The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way. The third is freedom from want... The fourth is freedom from fear.

Whoever seeks to set one race against another seeks to enslave all races.

We may not be able to prepare the future for our children, but we can at least prepare our children for the future.

Whoever seeks to set one religion against another seeks to destroy all religion.

We must be the great arsenal of Democracy.

With the enactment of the Income Tax Law of 1913, the Federal Government began to apply effectively the widely accepted principle that taxes should be levied in proportion to ability to pay and in proportion to the benefits received. Income was wisely chosen as the measure of benefits and of ability to pay. This was, and still is, a wholesome guide for national policy. It should be retained as the governing principle of Federal taxation. The use of other forms of taxes is often justifiable, particularly for temporary periods; but taxation according to income is the most effective instrument yet devised to obtain just contribution from those best able to bear it and to avoid placing onerous burdens upon the mass of our people.

We must especially beware of that small group of selfish men who would clip the wings of the American Eagle in order to feather their own nests.

Yes, we are on the way back — not by mere chance, not by a turn of the cycle. We are coming back more soundly than ever before because we planned it that way, and don't let anybody tell you differently.

We must lay hold of the fact that economic laws are not made by nature. They are made by human beings.

Yesterday, December 7, 1941 - a date which will live in infamy - The United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan...As Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense...With confidence in our armed forces - with the unbounded determination of our people - we will gain the inevitable triumph - so help us God.

We have here a human as well as an economic problem. When humane considerations are concerned, Americans give them precedence. The lessons of history, confirmed by the evidence immediately before me, show conclusively that continued dependence upon relief induces a spiritual and moral disintegration fundamentally destructive to the national fibre. To dole out relief in this way is to administer a narcotic, a subtle destroyer of the human spirit.

We must remember that any oppression, any injustice, any hatred, is a wedge designed to attack our civilization.

You are only an extra in everyone else's play.

We have learned that we cannot live here alone, at peace; that our own well-being is dependent on the well-being of other nations, far way. We have learned that we must live as men, and not as ostriches, nor as dogs in the manger. We have learned to be citizens of the world, members of the human community.

We must scrupulously guard the civil rights and civil liberties of all our citizens, whatever their background. We must remember that any oppression, any injustice, any hatred, is a wedge designed to attack our civilization.

We have the men – the skill – the wealth – and above all the will… We must be the great arsenal of democracy.

We shall strive for perfection. We shall not achieve it immediately—but we still shall strive. We may make mistakes—but they must never be mistakes which result from faintness of heart or abandonment of moral principle.

We have, however, a clear mandate from the people, that Americans must forswear that conception of the acquisition of wealth which, through excessive profits, creates undue private power over private affairs and, to our misfortune, over public affairs as well. In building toward this end we do not destroy ambition, nor do we seek to divide our wealth into equal shares on stated occasions. We continue to recognize the greater ability of some to earn more than others. But we do assert that the ambition of the individual to obtain for him and his a proper security, a reasonable leisure, and a decent living throughout life, is an ambition to be preferred to the appetite for great wealth and great power.

We stand committed to the proposition that freedom is no half-and-half affair. If the average citizen is guaranteed equal opportunity in the polling place, he must have equal opportunity in the market place.

Author Picture
First Name
Franklin D.
Last Name
Roosevelt, fully Franklin Delano Roosevelt, aka FDR
Birth Date
1882
Death Date
1945
Bio

American Politician, 32nd President of the United States, only American President elected to more than two terms