Frederick William Robertson, aka Roberson of Brighton

Frederick William
Robertson, aka Roberson of Brighton
1816
1853

English Divine

Author Quotes

Love God, and he will dwell with you. Obey God, and he will reveal to you the truth of his deepest teachings.

Poetry creates life; Science dissects death.

The one who will be found in trial capable of great acts of love is ever the one who is always doing considerate small ones.

To believe is to be strong. Doubt, cramps energy. Belief is power.

Love is not a union merely between two creatures, it is a union between two spirits.

Pray till prayer makes you forget your own wish, and leave it or merge it in God's will.

The question is, whether, like the Divine Child in the temple, we are turning knowledge into wisdom, and whether, understanding more of the mysteries of life, we are feeling more of its sacred law; and whether, having left behind the priests and the scribes and the doctors and the fathers, we are about our Father's business, and becoming wise to God.

To grieve over sin is one thing, to repent is another.

Make but few explanations. The character that cannot defend itself is not worth vindicating.

Remorse is the consciousness of doing wrong with no sense of love; penitence the same consciousness with the feeling of sorrow and tenderness added.

The true aim of everyone who aspires to be a teacher should be, not to impart his own opinions, but to kindle minds.

True rest is not that of torpor, but that of harmony; it is not refusing the struggle, but conquering in it; not resting from duty, but finding rest in it.

Marriage is not a union, merely between two creatures - it is a union between two spirits; and the intention of that bond is to perfect the nature of both, by supplementing their deficiencies with the force of contrast, giving to each sex those excellencies in which it is naturally deficient; to the one, strength of character and firmness of moral will; to the other, sympathy, meekness, tenderness; and just so solemn and glorious as these ends are for which the union was intended, just so terrible are the consequences if it be perverted and abused; for there is no earthly relationship which has so much power to ennoble and to exalt. There are two rocks, in this world of ours, on which the soul must either anchor or be wrecked - the one is God, and the other is the sex opposite.

Responsibility is measured, not by the amount of injury resulting from wrong action, but by the distinctness with which conscience has the opportunity of distinguishing between the right and the wrong.

The truest definition of evil is that which represents it as something contrary to nature; evil is evil because it is unnatural; a vine which should bear olive-berries, an eye to which blue seems yellow, would be diseased; an unnatural mother, an unnatural son, an unnatural act, are the strongest terms of condemnation.

Two thousand years ago there was One here on this earth who lived the grandest life that ever has been lived yet - a life that every thinking man, with deeper or shallower meaning, has agreed to call divine.

Men... are bettered and improved by trial, and refined out of broken hopes and blighted expectations.

Sacrifice alone, bare and unrelieved, is ghastly, unnatural, and dead; but self-sacrifice, illuminated by love, is warmth and life; it is the death of Christ, the life of God, and the blessedness and only proper life of man.

The truest view of life has always seemed to me to be that which shows that we are here not to enjoy, but to learn.

We are too much haunted by ourselves; we project the central shadow of ourselves on everything around us. And then comes in the gospel to rescue us from this selfishness. Redemption is this--to forget self in God.

Mourning after an absent God is an evidence of a love as strong, as rejoicing in a present one.

Science dissects death.

There are few signs in a soul's state more alarming than that of religious indifference, that is, the spirit of thinking all religions equally true— the real meaning of which is, that all religions are equally false.

We hear in these days a great deal respecting rights--the rights of private judgment, the rights of labor, the rights of property, and the rights of man. Rights are grand things, divine things in this world of God's; but the way in which we expound these rights, alas! seems to me to be the very incarnation of selfishness. I can see nothing very noble in a man who is forever going about calling for his own rights. Alas! alas! for the man who feels nothing more grand in this wondrous, divine world than his own rights.

Multifarious reading weakens the mind more than doing nothing, for it becomes a necessity, at last, like smoking: and is an excuse for the mind to lie dormant whilst thought is poured in, and runs through, a clear stream over unproductive gravel, on which not even mosses grow. It is the idlest of all idleness, and leaves more of impotency than any other.

Author Picture
First Name
Frederick William
Last Name
Robertson, aka Roberson of Brighton
Birth Date
1816
Death Date
1853
Bio

English Divine