George Sand, pen name for Amandine Lucte Aurore Dupin, Baronne Dudevant

George
Sand, pen name for Amandine Lucte Aurore Dupin, Baronne Dudevant
1804
1876

French Writer, Memoirist and Novelist

Author Quotes

All of us who have time and money to spare, travel — that is to say, we flee; since surely it is not so much a question of travelling as of getting away? Which of us has not some sorrow to dull, or some yoke to cast off?

He who draws noble delights from sentiments of poetry is a true poet, though he has never written a line in all his life.

Immodest creature, you do not want a woman who will accept your faults, you want the one who pretends you are faultless – one who will caress the hand that strikes her and kiss the lips that lie to her.

Life resembles a novel more often than novels resemble life.

One knows what one has lost, but not what one may find.

The world will know and understand me someday. But if that day does not arrive, it does not greatly matter. I shall have opened the way for other women.

You can bind my body, tie my hands, govern my actions: you are the strongest, and society adds to your power; but with my will, sir, you can do nothing.

Art for art’s sake is an empty phrase. Art for the sake of the true, art for the sake of the good and the beautiful, that is the faith I am searching for.

He who finds elevated and lofty pleasures in the feeling of poetry is a true poet, though he has never composed a line of verse in his entire lifetime.

In the stormy days of our youth, we imagine that solitude is a sure refuge from the assaults of life, a certain balm for the wounds of battle. This is a serious mistake, and experience teaches us that, if we cannot live in peace with our fellow-men, neither romantic raptures nor aesthetic enjoyment will ever fill the abyss gaping at the bottom of our hearts.

Liszt said to me today that God alone deserves to be loved. It may be true, but when one has loved a man it is very different to love God.

The artist vocation is to send light into the human heart.

There are no greater prudes than those women who have some secret to hide.

Art for the sake of art itself is an idle sentence. Art for the sake of truth, for the sake of what is beautiful and good — that is the creed I seek.

His creation was spontaneous, miraculous. He found it without searching for it, without foreseeing it. It came to his piano suddenly, complete, sublime, or it sang in his head during a walk, and he would hasten to hear it again by, tossing it off on his instrument. But then would begin the most heartbreaking labor I have ever witnessed. It was a series of efforts, indecision, and impatience to recapture certain details of the theme he had heard: what had come to him all of a piece, he now over-analyzed in his desire to write it down, and his regret at not finding it again "neat," as he said, would throw him into a kind of despair. He would shut himself up in his room for days at a time, weeping, pacing, breaking his pens, repeating and changing a single measure a hundred times, writing it and effacing it with equal frequency, and beginning again the next day with a meticulous and desperate perseverance. He would spend six weeks on one page, only to end up writing it just as he had traced it in his first outpouring.

In times when evil comes because men misunderstand and hate one another, it is the mission of the artist to praise sweetness, confidence, and friendship, and so to remind men, hardened or discouraged, that pure morals, tender sentiments, and primitive justice still exist, or at least can exist, in this world.

Love without reverence and enthusiasm is only friendship.

The beauty that addresses itself to the eyes is only the spell of the moment; the eye of the body is not always that of the soul.

There is but one virtue - the eternal sacrifice of self.

Art is a demonstration of which nature is the proof.

His genius [Chopin] was filled with the mysterious sounds of nature, but transformed into sublime equivalents in musical thought, and not through slavish imitation of the actual external sounds. His composition of that night was surely filled with raindrops, resounding clearly on the tiles of the Charterhouse, but it had been transformed in his imagination and in his song into tears falling upon his heart from the sky... The gift of Chopin is [the expression of] the deepest and fullest feelings and emotions that have ever existed. He made a single instrument speak a language of infinity. He could often sum up, in ten lines that a child could play, poems of a boundless exaltation, dramas of unequalled power.

It is a mistake to regard age as a downhill grade toward dissolution. The reverse is true. As one grows older, one climbs with surprising strides.

Lying, like license, has its degrees.

The beauty that speaks to the eyes, she continued, is that the prestige of a moment. Oeuil the body is not always that of the soul.

This is not the first time I noticed how, particularly in France, the words have more power than ideas.

Author Picture
First Name
George
Last Name
Sand, pen name for Amandine Lucte Aurore Dupin, Baronne Dudevant
Birth Date
1804
Death Date
1876
Bio

French Writer, Memoirist and Novelist