George Savile, fully Sir George Savile, 1st Marquis of Halifax

George
Savile, fully Sir George Savile, 1st Marquis of Halifax
1633
1695

English Statesman, Writer, Orator and Politician serving in the House of Commons and House of Lords

Author Quotes

The sense of ultimate truth is the intellectual counterpart of the esthetic sense of perfect beauty, or the moral sense of perfect good.

A man is to go about his own business as if he had not a friend in the world to help him in it.

The Triumph of Wit is to make your good Nature subdue your Censure; to be quick in seeing Faults, and slow in exposing them. You are to consider, that the invisible thing called a Good Name, is made up of the Breath of Numbers that speak well of you; so that if by a disobliging Word you silence the meanest, the Gale will be less strong which is to bear up your Esteem.

A Man may so overdo it in looking too far before him, that he may stumble the more for it.

To the question, What shall we do to be saved in this World? there is no other answer but this, Look to your Moat.

A wise man will keep his Suspicions muzzled, but he will keep them awake.

When by habit a man cometh to have a bargaining soul, its wings are cut, so that it can never soar. It bindeth reason an apprentice to gain, and instead of a director, maketh it a drudge.

Half the Truth is often as arrant a Lye, as can be made.

Hope is generally a wrong Guide, though it is very good Company by the way. It brusheth through Hedge and Ditch till it cometh to a great Leap, and there it is apt to fall and break its Bones.

Hope is generally a wrong Guide, though it is very good Company by the way.

It is not a reproach but a compliment to learning, to say, that great scholars are less fit for business; since the truth is, business is so much a lower thing than learning, that a man used to the last cannot easily bring his stomach down to the first.

Malice is of a low Stature, but it hath very long Arms. It often reacheth into the next World, Death itself is not a Bar to it.

Men are so unwilling to displease a Prince, that it is as dangerous to inform him right, as to serve him wrong.

Men make it such a point of honor to be fit for business that they forget to examine whether business is fit for a man.

Modesty is oftener mistaken than any other Virtue.

Money hath too great a Preference given to it by States, as well as by particular Men.

Remember that Children and Fools want everything because they want Wit to distinguish: and therefore there is no stronger Evidence of a Crazy Understanding, than the making too large a Catalogue of things necessary, when in truth there are so very few things that have a right to be placed in it.

Suspicion seldom wanteth Food to keep it up in Health and Vigour. It feedeth upon every thing it seeth, and is not curious in its Diet.

The first mistake belonging to business is the going into it.

A wife is to thank God her husband hath faults. ... A husband without faults is a dangerous observer.

Laws are generally not understood by three sorts of persons, viz, by those who make them, by those who execute them, and by those who suffer if they break them

Nothing would more contribute to make a man wise than to have always an enemy in his view.

You should live in the world so as it may hang about you like a loose garment.

Anger is never without an argument, but seldom with a good one.

Love is a passion that hath friends in the garrison.

Author Picture
First Name
George
Last Name
Savile, fully Sir George Savile, 1st Marquis of Halifax
Birth Date
1633
Death Date
1695
Bio

English Statesman, Writer, Orator and Politician serving in the House of Commons and House of Lords