Gilbert Keith "G.K." Chesteron

Gilbert Keith "G.K."
Chesteron
1874
1936

English Writer including Philosophy, Ontology, Poetry, Play Writing, Journalism, Public Lecturing, Debating, Literary and Art Criticism, Biography, Christian Apologetics, Fantasy and Detective Fiction

Author Quotes

In the end it will not matter to us whether we fought with flails or reeds. It will matter to us greatly on what side we fought.

I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and that the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself.

I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and that the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself.

I came to the conclusion that the optimist thought everything good except the pessimist, and that the pessimist thought everything bad, except himself.

The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion.

The people who are the most bigoted are the people who have no convictions at all.

All things are from God; and above all, reason and imagination and the great gifts of the mind. They are good in themselves; and we must not altogether forget their origin even in their perversion.

Art is the signature of man.

The most incredible thing about miracles is that they happen.

Moderate strength is shown in violence, supreme strength is shown in levity.

Life is not an illogicality; yet it is a trap for logicians. It looks just a little more mathematical and regular than it is; its exactitude is obvious, but its inexactitude is hidden; its wildness lies in wait.

It is idle to talk always of the alternative of reason and faith. Reason is itself a matter of faith. It is an act of faith to assert that our thoughts have any relation to reality at all.

Materialists and madmen never have doubts.

It is not only possible to say a great deal in praise of play; it is really possible to say the highest things in praise of it. It might reasonably be maintained that the true object of all human life is play. Earth is a task garden; heaven is a playground. To be at last in such secure innocence that one can juggle with the universe and the stars, to be so good that one can treat everything as a joke — that may be, perhaps, the real end and final holiday of human souls.

The chief object of education is not to learn things; nay, the chief object of education is to unlearn things.

An inconvenience is only an adventure wrongly considered; an adventure is an inconvenience rightly considered.

There is a great man who makes every man feel small. But the real great man is the man who makes every man feel great.

Much of our modern difficulty, in religion and other things, arises merely from this: that we confuse the word "indefinable" with the word "vague."

Truths turn into dogmas the instant that they are disputed. Thus every man who utters a doubt defines a religion. And the scepticism of our time does not really destroy the beliefs, rather it creates them; gives them their limits and their plain and defiant shape.

The modern world is filled with men who hold dogmas so strongly that they do not even know that they are dogmas.

Human nature simply cannot subsist without a hope and aim of some kind...

Ideas are dangerous, but the man to whom they are least dangerous is the man of ideas. He is acquainted with ideas, and moves among them like a lion-tamer. Ideas are dangerous, but the man to whom they are most dangerous is the man of no ideas.

A man cannot be wise enough to be a great artist without being wise enough to wish to be a philosopher. A man cannot have the energy to produce good art without having the energy to wish to pass beyond it. A small artist is content with art; a great artist is content with nothing except everything

Charity is the power of defending that which we know to be indefensible. Hope is the power of being cheerful in circumstances which we know to be desperate. It is true that there is a state of hope which belongs to bright prospects and the morning; but that is not the virtue of hope. The virtue of hope exists only in earthquake and, eclipse. It is true that there is a thing crudely called charity, which means charity to the deserving poor; but charity to the deserving is not charity at all, but justice. It is the undeserving who require it, and the ideal either does not exist at all, or exists wholly for them. For practical purposes it is at the hopeless moment that we require the hopeful man, and the virtue either does not exist at all, or begins to exist at that moment. Exactly at the instant when hope ceases to be reasonable it begins to be useful.

Happiness is a mystery like religion, and should never be rationalised.

Author Picture
First Name
Gilbert Keith "G.K."
Last Name
Chesteron
Birth Date
1874
Death Date
1936
Bio

English Writer including Philosophy, Ontology, Poetry, Play Writing, Journalism, Public Lecturing, Debating, Literary and Art Criticism, Biography, Christian Apologetics, Fantasy and Detective Fiction