Grover Cleveland, fully Stephen Grover Cleveland

Grover
Cleveland, fully Stephen Grover Cleveland
1837
1908

American Politician, 22nd and 24th President of the United States

Author Quotes

The lessons of paternalism ought to be unlearned and the better lesson taught that while people should patriotically and cheerfully support their Government its functions do not include the support of the people

When more of the people's sustenance is exacted through the form of taxation than is necessary to meet the just obligations of government and expenses of its economical administration, such exaction becomes ruthless extortion and a violation of the fundamental principles of free government.

The ship of democracy, which has weathered all storms, may sink through the mutiny of those on board.

When with true American enthusiasm we recall the story of our war for independence and rejoice in the indomitable courage and fortitude of our revolutionary heroes, we should not fail to remember how well the Jews of America performed their part in the struggle.

The truly American sentiment recognizes the dignity of labor and the fact that honor lies in natural toil.

Your every voter, as surely as your chief magistrate, exercises a public trust.

The trusts and combinations—the communism of pelf—whose machinations have prevented us from reaching the success we deserved, should not be forgotten nor forgiven.

The United States is not a nation to which peace is a necessity.

There is no calamity which a great nation can invite which equals that which follows a supine submission to wrong and injustice and the consequent loss of national self-respect and honor, beneath which are shielded and defended a people's safety and great

There surely is no difference in his duties and obligations, whether a person is intrusted with the money of one man or many. And yet it sometimes appears as though the office-holder assumes that a different rule of fidelity prevails between him and the taxpayers

These are days of special perplexity and depression, and the path of public duty is unusually rugged.

This vigilance on the part of the citizen, and an active interest and participation in political concerns, are the safeguards of his rights; but sluggish indifference to political privileges invites the machinations of those who wait to betray the people's trust.

Today the United States is practically sovereign on this continent, and its fiat is law upon the subjects to which it confines its interposition.

Unswerving loyalty to duty, constant devotion to truth, and a clear conscience will overcome every discouragement and surely lead the way to usefulness and high achievement.

We are not here today to bow before the representation of a fierce warlike god, filled with wrath and vengeance, but we joyously contemplate instead our own deity keeping watch and ward before the open gates of America and greater than all that have been celebrated in ancient song. Instead of grasping in her hand thunderbolts of terror and of death, she holds aloft the light which illumines the way to man's enfranchisement. We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home, nor shall her chosen altar be neglected. Willing votaries will constantly keep alive its fires and these shall gleam upon the shores of our sister Republic thence, and joined with answering rays a stream of light shall pierce the darkness of ignorance and man's oppression, until Liberty enlightens the world.

We do not believe that the American people will knowingly elect to the Presidency a coarse debauchee who would bring his harlots with him to Washington, and hire lodgings for them convenient to the White House.

We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home, nor shall her chosen altar be neglected.

What is the use of being elected or re-elected unless you stand for something?

The lesson should be constantly enforced that though the people support the Government, Government should not support the people.

Whatever you do, tell the truth.

Amid the din of party strife the people's choice was made, but its attendant circumstances have demonstrated anew the strength and safety of a government by the people. In each succeeding year it more clearly appears that our democratic principle needs no apology, and that in its fearless and faithful application is to be found the surest guaranty of good government. But the best results in the operation of a government wherein every citizen has a share largely depend upon a proper limitation of purely partisan zeal and effort and a correct appreciation of the time when the heat of the partisan should be merged in the patriotism of the citizen.

I know that I am honest and sincere in my desire to do well; but the question is whether I know enough to accomplish what I desire.

Officeholders are the agents of the people, not their masters. Not only is their time and labor due to the Government, but they should scrupulously avoid in their political action, as well as in the discharge of their official duty, offending by a display of obtrusive partisanship their neighbors who have relations with them as public officials.

And still the question, “What shall be done with our ex-Presidents” is not laid at rest and I sometimes think Watterson's solution of it, Take them out and shoot them, is worthy of attention.

I know there is a Supreme Being who rules the affairs of men and whose goodness and mercy have always followed the American people, and I know He will not turn from us now if we humbly and reverently seek His powerful aid.

Author Picture
First Name
Grover
Last Name
Cleveland, fully Stephen Grover Cleveland
Birth Date
1837
Death Date
1908
Bio

American Politician, 22nd and 24th President of the United States