Hans Blix, fully Hans Martin Blix

Hans
Blix, fully Hans Martin Blix
1928

Swedish Diplomat and Politician for the Liberal People's Party, Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs, The Head of The International Atomic Energy Agency, United Nations' Chief Weapons Inspector

Author Quotes

But I would say if the Security Council is only relevant if it agrees with the United States, then we have come a long way in a direction that I do not like very much.

If you take the biological weapons in the United States we still will have perhaps a single individual who was able to make anthrax, dry it, and spread it through the mail and cause terror.

The recent inspection find in the private home of a scientist of a box of some 3,000 pages of documents, much of it relating to the laser enrichment of uranium support a concern that has long existed that documents might be distributed to the homes of private individuals. ...we cannot help but think that the case might not be isolated and that such placements of documents is deliberate to make discovery difficult and to seek to shield documents by placing them in private homes.

But in the Middle Ages people were convinced there were witches. They looked for them and they certainly found them.

International cooperation, multilateralism is indispensable.

The South Africans decided that they would like to prove to the world they did not have any nuclear weapons and their decision was not doubted because it was the end of the Cold War, it was also the end of apartheid.

By and large my relations with the US were good.

Iraq did not spontaneously opt for disarmament. They did it as part of a ceasefire, so they were forced to do it, otherwise the war might have gone on. So the motivation has been very different.

The U.N. is much more than the case of Iraq.

Disarmament by war and democracy by occupation are difficult prospects.

It was to do with information management. The intention was to dramatise it.

The world has gotten so interwoven.

Even on television, the wavelengths that you use, they have to be distributed between countries.

It's true the Iraqis misbehaved and had no credibility but that doesn't necessarily mean that they were in the wrong.

There are people in this administration who say they don't care if the UN sinks under the East river, and other crude thing.

For some twenty years the window that opened at the end of the Cold War has been allowed to hang flapping in the wind. It is high time that the five nuclear-weapon states take seriously their commitment to negotiate toward nuclear disarmament.

Like I said, I'm more worried long term about the environmental issues then the use of arms.

There was a very consistent creation of a virtual reality, and eventually it collided with our old-fashioned, ordinary reality.

How much, if any, is left of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction and related proscribed items and programmes? So far, UNMOVIC has not found any such weapons, only a small number of empty chemical munitions, which should have been declared and destroyed. Another matter - and one of great significance - is that many proscribed weapons and items are not accounted for.

Look at the Palestinians with the huge, huge percentage of unemployed. What does that breed? Anyone who's unemployed in the world, you feel there's no meaning and there's a risk that you drift over to something desperate. Yes, we have to tackle the social problems as well.

There were about 700 inspections, and in no case did we find weapons of mass destruction? We went to sites [in Iraq] given to us by intelligence, and only in three cases did we find something" - a stash of nuclear documents, some Vulcan boosters, and several empty warheads for chemical weapons. More inspections were required to determine whether these findings were the "tip of the iceberg" or simply fragments remaining from that deadly iceberg's past destruction.

I also hear your president say that war is the means of last resort and I think he means that. I met him last autumn and he assured me that they wanted to come through and disarm Iraq by peaceful means, and that's what we are trying to do as hard as we can.

Negotiations with Iran, especially, will not be easy under any circumstances, but I suspect that they might be somewhat less difficult if the nuclear-weapon states could show that their requests are part of a broader effort to lead the world, including themselves, toward nuclear disarmament. Preventing further proliferation is essential, but it is not a recipe for success to preach to the rest of the world to stay away from the very weapons that nuclear states claim are indispensable to their own security.

They have been saying for a long time that Iraq made an effort to import active uranium, and my colleague demonstrated the other day that they came to the conclusion that it was a fake document that everybody is relying upon.

I can imagine that the Iraqis undertake the destruction out of fear. If they had denied it, if they had said no, that certainly would have played into the hands of those that would like to take armed action immediately. I have no illusions in that regard.

First Name
Hans
Last Name
Blix, fully Hans Martin Blix
Birth Date
1928
Bio

Swedish Diplomat and Politician for the Liberal People's Party, Swedish Minister for Foreign Affairs, The Head of The International Atomic Energy Agency, United Nations' Chief Weapons Inspector