Henry Ward Beecher

Henry Ward
Beecher
1813
1887

American Clergyman, Editor, Writer

Author Quotes

We should so live and labor in our time that what came to us as seed may; go to the next generation as blossom, and what came to us as blossom may go to them as fruit. This is what is meant by progress.

We sleep, but the loom of life never stops, and the pattern which was weaving when the sun went down is weaving when it comes up in the morning.

Watch lest prosperity destroy generosity.

We never know the love of our parents for us till we have become parents.

Troubles are often the tools God fashions us for better things.

Very few men acquire wealth in such a manner as to receive pleasure from it. As long as there is the enthusiasm of the chase they enjoy it. But when they begin to look around and think of settling down, they find that that part by which joy enters in, is dead in them. They have spent their lives in heaping up colossal piles of treasure, which stand at the end, like the pyramids in the desert, holding only the dust of things.

To spend several days in a friend's house and hunger for something to read, while you are treading on costly carpets, and sitting upon luxurious chairs and sleeping upon down, is as if one were bribing your body for the sake of cheating your mind.

Troubles are often the tools by which God fashions us for better things.

Thinking cannot be clear till it has had expression. We must write, or speak, or act our thoughts, or they will remain in a half torpid form. Our feelings must have expression, or they will be as clouds, which, till they descend in rain, will never bring up fruit or flower. So it is with all the inward feelings; expression gives them development. Thought is the blossom; language the opening bud; action the fruit behind it.

To become an able and successful man in any profession, three things are necessary, nature, study and practice.

There never was a person who did anything worth doing that did not receive more than he gave.

The strength and the happiness of a man consists in finding out the way in which God is going, and going in that way, too.

There can be no high civilization where there is not ample leisure.

There is no liberty to men whose passions are stronger than their religious feelings; there is no liberty to men in whom ignorance predominates over knowledge; there is no liberty to men who know not how to govern themselves.

The purest pleasures lie within the circle of useful occupation. Mere pleasure, sought outside of usefulness, is fraught with poison.

The purest pleasures lie within the circle of useful occupation. Mere pleasure, sought outside of usefulness, is fraught with poison.

The mystery of history is an insoluble problem.

The imagination is the secret and marrow of civilization. It is the very eye of faith.

The meanest, most contemptible kind of praise is that which first speaks well of a man, and then qualifies it with a "but."

The hungry of the eye is not to be despised; and they are to be pitied who have starvation of the eye.

The imagination is the secret and harrow of civilization. It is the very eye of faith.

The gravest events dawn with no more noise than the morning star makes in rising. All great developments complete themselves in the world, and modestly wait in silence, praising themselves never, and announcing themselves not at all. We must be sensitive, and sensible, if we would see the beginnings and endings of great things.

The highest order that was ever instituted on earth is the order of faith.

The fear of doing right is the grand treason in times of danger.

The first hour of the morning is the rudder of the day.

Author Picture
First Name
Henry Ward
Last Name
Beecher
Birth Date
1813
Death Date
1887
Bio

American Clergyman, Editor, Writer