J. R. R. Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

J. R. R.
Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
1954
1973

English Writer, Fantasy Novelist, Poet, Philologist and University Profess best known for The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion

Author Quotes

We are all wanderers on this earth. Our hearts are full of wonder, and our souls are deep with dreams.

We shouldn't be here at all, if we'd known more about it before we started. But I suppose it's often that way. The brave things in the old tales and songs, Mr. Frodo: adventures, as I used to call them. I used to think that they we're things the wonderful folk of the stories went out and looked for, because they wanted them, because they we're exciting and life was a bit dull, a kind of a sport, as you might say. But that's not the way of it with the tales that really mattered, or the ones that stay in the mind. Folk seem to have been just landed in them, usually their paths we're laid that way, as you put it. But I expect they had lots of chances, like us, of turning back, only they didn't. And if they had, we shouldn't 0know, because they'd have been forgotten. We hear about those as just went on and not all to a good end, mind you; at least not to what folk inside a story and not outside it call a good end. You know, coming home, and finding things all right, though not quite the same like old Mr Bilbo. But those aren't always the best tales to hear, though they may be the best tales to get landed in I wonder what sort of a tale we've fallen into?

What do you fear, lady? [Aragorn] asked. A cage, [owyn] said. To stay behind bars, until use and old age accept them, and all chance of doing great deeds is gone beyond recall or desire.

Where and what are Helm?s Deep and all the rest of it? said Merry. I don?t know anything about this country. Then you?d best learn something, if you wish to understand what is happening, said Gandalf. But not just now, and not from me: I have too many pressing things to think about. All right, I?ll tackle Strider at the camp-fire: he?s less testy. But why all this secrecy? I thought we?d won the battle!

Trolls are slow in the uptake, and mighty suspicious about anything new to them.

We are lost, lost,' said Gollum. 'No name, no business, no Precious, nothing. Only empty. Only hungry; yes, we are hungry. A few little fishes, nasty bony little fishes, for a poor creature, and they say death. So wise they are; so just, so very just

We swears, to serve the master of the Precious. We will swear on? on the Precious!

What do you mean? he said. Do you wish me a good morning, or mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not; or that you feel good this morning; or that it is a morning to be good on?

Where are you going, Master?' cried Sam, though at last he understood what was happening. 'To the Havens, Sam,' said Frodo. 'And I can't come.' 'No, Sam. Not yet, anyway, not further than the Havens. Though you too were a Ring-bearer, if only for a little while. Your time may come. Do not be too sad, Sam. You cannot always be torn in two. You will have to be one and whole, for many years. You have so much to enjoy and to be, and to do.' 'But,' said Sam, and tears started in his eyes, 'I thought you were going to enjoy the Shire, too, for years and years, after all you have done.' 'So I thought too, once. But I have been too deeply hurt, Sam. I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: someone has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them. But you are my heir: all that I had and might have had I leave to you. And also you have Rose, and Elanor; and Frodo-lad will come, and Rosie-lass, and Merry, and Goldilocks, and Pippin; and perhaps more that I cannot see. Your hands and your wits will be needed everywhere. You will be the Mayor, of course, as long as you want to be, and the most famous gardener in history; and you will read things out of the Red Book, and keep alive the memory of the age that is gone, so that people will remember the Great Danger, and so love their beloved land all the more. And that will keep you as busy and as happy as anyone can be, as long as your part in the Story goes on. 'Come now, ride with me!

Trolls simply detest the very sight of dwarves (uncooked).

We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner!

We wants it, we needs it. Must have the precious. They stole it from us. Sneaky little hobbitses. Wicked, tricksy, false!

What does your heart tell you?

Where did you go to, if I may ask? said Thorin to Gandalf as they rode along. "To look ahead," said he. "And what brought you back in the nick of time?" "Looking behind," said he.

True courage is about knowing not when to take a life, but when to spare one.

We are plain quiet folk, and I have no use for adventures. Nasty, disturbing, and uncomfortable things.

Well here we are, just the four of us that started out together,' said Merry. 'We have left all the rest behind, one after another. It seems almost like a dream that has slowly faded.' 'Not to me,' said Frodo. 'To me it feels more like falling asleep again.

What has it got to do with the story? Where is this place? Why emus? And what is the thing in the foreground with pink bulbs? ~On a cover painting for The Hobbit that depicted a hill, two emus, and a Christmas tree.

Where have you gone, if I can ask you? Said Thorin to Gandalf as they rode. A look ahead, 'said Gandalf. So what made ??you come back at the right time? Look back.

True education is a kind of never ending story ? a matter of continual beginnings, of habitual fresh starts, of persistent newness.

We are sitting on a field of victory enjoying a few well-earned comforts.

Well, here at last, dear friends, on the shores of the Sea comes the end of our fellowship in Middle-Earth. Go in peace! I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil.

What have I got in my pocket? he said aloud. He was talking to himself, but Gollum thought it was a riddle, and he was frightfully upset. Not fair! not fair! he hissed. It isn't fair, my precious, is it, to ask us what it's got in its nassty little pocketsess?

Where is he?' said Frodo, looking round, as if he expected a masked and sinister figure to come out of a cupboard.

Truly songs and tales fall utterly short of the reality, O Smaug the Chiefest and greatest of Calamities.

Author Picture
First Name
J. R. R.
Last Name
Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
Birth Date
1954
Death Date
1973
Bio

English Writer, Fantasy Novelist, Poet, Philologist and University Profess best known for The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion