J. R. R. Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien

J. R. R.
Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
1954
1973

English Writer, Fantasy Novelist, Poet, Philologist and University Profess best known for The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion

Author Quotes

This was the first of the sorrows of Turin.

To many, perhaps to most people outside the small company of the great scholars, past and present, 'Celtic' of any sort is, nonetheless, a magic bag, into which anything may be put, and out of which almost anything may come.... Anything is possible in the fabulous Celtic twilight, which is not so much a twilight of the gods as of the reason.

There are many things in the deep waters; and seas and lands may change. And it is not our part here to take thought only for a season, or for a few lives of Men, or for a passing age of the world. We should seek a final end of this menace, even if we do not hope to make one.

There is some good in this world, and it's worth fighting for.

There's some good in this world and it's worth fighting for.

They seem a bit above my likes and dislikes, so to speak, answered Sam slowly. It don't seem to matter what I think about them. They are quite different from what I expected ? so old and young, and so gay and sad, as it were.

Those we're happier days, when there was still close friendship at times between folk of different race, even between Dwarves and Elves. It was not the fault of the Dwarves that the friendship waned, said Gimli. I have not heard that it was the fault of the Elves, said Legolas. I have heard both, said Gandalf.

To me, clowns aren't funny. In fact, they're kinda scary. I've wondered where this started, and I think it goes back to the time I went to the circus and a clown killed my dad.

There are no safe paths in this part of the world. Remember you are over the Edge of the Wild now, and in for all sorts of fun wherever you go.

There is still hope.

There's some good in this world, Mr. Frodo... and it's worth fighting for.

They tend to be thick belly, wear bright colors (mostly green and yellow), do not wear shoes, because feet have natural leather soles and thick hair, warm brown color, as they grow in the heads (which is curly), the fingers are long, crafty and dark, good-natured faces, and laugh deep and juicy laughs (especially after dinner, which they do twice a day, when they can).

Those who used the Nine Rings became mighty in their day, kings, sorcerers, and warriors of old. They obtained glory and great wealth, yet it turned to their undoing. They had, as it seemed, unending life, yet life became unendurable to them. They could walk, if they would, unseen by all eyes in this world beneath the sun, and they could see things in worlds invisible to mortal men; but too often they beheld only the phantoms and delusions of Sauron. And one by one, sooner or later, according to their native strength and to the good or evil of their wills in the beginning, they fell under the thraldom of the ring that they bore and under the domination of the One, which was Sauron's. And they became for ever invisible save to him that wore the Ruling Ring, and they entered into the realm of shadows. The Nazg–l were they, the Ringwraiths, the Enemy's most terrible servants; darkness went with them, and they cried with the voices of death.

To Sam's final and complete satisfaction and pure joy, a minstrel of Gondor stood forth, and knelt, and begged leave to sing. And behold! he said: 'Lo! lords and knights and men of valor unashamed, kings and princes, and fair people of Gondor, and Riders of Rohan, and ye sons of Elrond, and D£nedain of the North, and Elf and Dwarf, and greathearts of the Shire, and all free folk of the West, now listen to my lay. For I will sing to you of Frodo of the Nine Fingers and the Ring of Doom.' And when Sam heard that he laughed aloud for sheer delight, and he stood up and cried: 'O great glory and splendor! And all my wishes have come true!' And then he wept.

There are older and fouler things than Orcs in the deep places of the world.

There is the tragedy and despair of all machinery laid bare. Unlike art which is content to create a new secondary world in the mind, it attempts to actualize desire, and so to create power in this World; and that cannot really be done with any real satisfaction. Labor-saving machinery only creates endless and worse labor... I will forgive Mordor-gadgets some of their sins, if they will bring [this letter] quickly to you.

These are Worstishre Rabbits; I'd like to see them try.

They tried to pierce your heart with a Morgul-knife which remains in the wound. If they had succeeded, you would have become like they are, only weaker and under their command. You would have become a wraith under the dominion of the Dark Lord.

Those who wander are not always lost.

To the dismay of those that stood by, about the body of Saruman a grey mist gathered, and rising very slowly to a great height like smoke from a fire, as a pale shrouded figure it loomed over the Hill. For a moment it wavered, looking to the West; but out of the West came a cold wind, and it bent away, and with a sigh dissolved into nothing.

There are other men, and other lives, and time still to be.

There may come a time at last that I shall take the hidden paths that run east of the moon west of the sun.

These folk are hewers of trees and hunters of beasts; therefore we are their unfriends, and if they will not depart we shall afflict them in all ways that we can.

They walked as it were in a black vapour wrought of veritable darkness itself that, as it was breathed, brought blindness not only to eyes but to the mind, so that even the memory of colors and of forms and of any light faded out of thought. Night had always been, and always would be, and night was all.

Though he walked and breathed, and about him living leaves and flowers were stirred by the same cool wind as fanned his face, Frodo felt he was in a timeless land that did not fade or change or fall into forgetfulness. When he had gone and passed again into the outer world, still Frodo the wanderer from the Shire would walk there, upon the grass among elanor and niphredil in fair Lothlorien

Author Picture
First Name
J. R. R.
Last Name
Tolkien, fully John Ronald Reuel Tolkien
Birth Date
1954
Death Date
1973
Bio

English Writer, Fantasy Novelist, Poet, Philologist and University Profess best known for The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings and The Silmarillion